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What is a good OPS?


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#1 headchopper

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 10:21 PM

Just exactly how do they formulate the OPS #...and what is considered a really good OPS and what would be considered a poor OPS??? Thanks
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#2 FUM

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 10:24 PM

On base % + Slugging %

I guess a good OBP is .400

And a good Slugging % is over .500

So we're looking at a OPS of .900 or so or over as a good one.
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#3 Fenam

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 10:25 PM

View Postheadchopper, on May 28 2009, 10:21 PM, said:

Just exactly how do they formulate the OPS #...and what is considered a really good OPS and what would be considered a poor OPS??? Thanks

OPS= On base percantage + slugging percentage

I'd say a very good OPS is 1.000+ while a good OPS is .800+

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#4 PhD Gator

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 10:28 PM

I would say that a good OPS varies by position.  An OPS of .900 which is what the previous poster said, would be pretty dominant from a C.  However, for an outfielder or a 1b, .900 would be very good, but not unbelievable.  

I like to use a rule of .800 to be a serviceable fantasy player, but you definitely can't use that as a true cutoff.  If a player steals a lot of bases or contributes in some other way, than a lower OPS is acceptable.

Edited by PhD Gator, 28 May 2009 - 10:29 PM.

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#5 maybach

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 10:56 PM

.750 - Mediocre
.800 - Serviceable
.850 - Solid
.900 - Great
.950 - All-Star
1.000 - Pujols

#6 giggity

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 11:11 PM

Also, keep in mind league averages.  I find that they are fairly consistent.  For example, I am two leagues - a 12 team H2H and a 14 team H2H.  Here's a little statistical analysis of team OPS in those leagues:

12 team
avg: .818
median: .808

14 team
avg: .817
median: .807


That's fantasy league average, mind you.  You'll be in the middle of the pack with a .817 OPS.  So what's a "really good" OPS?  If .817 is in the 50th percentile, an OPS in the 85-90th percentile would be somewhere around .850-.860.
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#7 Kingctb27

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 11:19 PM

Well OPS isn't the only thing to look for honestly, esp in fantasy leagues that don't count it when evaluating players.  Guys who steal a boat load of bases are basically not going to post a great OPS.  

Guys like Reyes (who will probably never have an OPS over .900) have other skills that help ball clubs besides just slugging.
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#8 mcgovj5112

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 07:53 AM

View Postgiggity, on May 29 2009, 12:11 AM, said:

Also, keep in mind league averages.  I find that they are fairly consistent.  For example, I am two leagues - a 12 team H2H and a 14 team H2H.  Here's a little statistical analysis of team OPS in those leagues:

12 team
avg: .818
median: .808

14 team
avg: .817
median: .807


That's fantasy league average, mind you.  You'll be in the middle of the pack with a .817 OPS.  So what's a "really good" OPS?  If .817 is in the 50th percentile, an OPS in the 85-90th percentile would be somewhere around .850-.860.

Smooth post.  Was going to put up something similar, but you said it all.

#9 Torontoguy

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 02:07 PM

If you do not have an OBP/SLG do not look at OPS for fantasy purposes. Anyway, a good OPS depends entirely on position AS WELL as park. Hitting 40 HRs in Coors and hitting 40 HRs in San Diego are two entirely different things. If you go to Baseball-reference.com (an incredible site) you will see a stat called OPS+ or adjusted OPS which adjusts for park factors and league average. For example, the top-5 in OPS in the NL this year are Ibanez, Votto, Pujols, Upton, and Beltran while if you look at OPS+ the top-5 is Pujols, Ibanez, Votto, Gonzalez, an Beltran.