ipstaff

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  1. Just wrote this above, but Clemente compares. He was moving to the late phase of his career, but was still winning All-Star nominations and Gold Gloves in his final season.
  2. Yes. The closest comparison to this is probably Roberto Clemente's untimely passing at the height of his Hall of Fame career. Many of us on this board would be too young to remember, or in fact may not even have been born when this happened on December 31, 1972. Roberto was also much beloved, an amazing attitude, a fantastic ambassador of the game - he died when the plane he and others were using to deliver aid to Nicaragua in the aftermath of a devastating earthquake went down - and a transformative talent on the field. Baseball's annual humanitarian award is named for him. A piece of history I am sure we all wish had never been repeated.
  3. His story was an inspiration. Loved his toughness and his clear love for the game. The quote from the interview after his first start always stuck with me. No, he wasn't scared to face guys like David Wright: "The only thing I was scared about was getting in that boat, getting shot at. Sometimes jumping in the water. After that, I'm not scared about anything else. I've been in jail. I've been shot at. I've been in the water. What am I going to do? That's why, when people say to me, 'Are you nervous, are you scared?' I'm not scared to do anything." Sickened by the loss for his girlfriend and impending child. This is a sad day for any fan of baseball, or fan of a man's will conquering adversity, but it's the worst news imaginable for his young family to be. My heart goes out to them.
  4. As expected based on who they had lined up...
  5. Reports of the Cubs' death as of this ASB appear to have been... greatly exaggerated. First half 53-35 with a +139 run differential and a .602 win%. 2nd half 41-19 with a +87 run differential and a .683 win%. They won 78.6% of their games in August. And they have followed it up by winning 56.3% of their games in September (so far). Their .786 August was even better than their .773 April. Heck, take out their two hottest months, April and August. Just get rid of them entirely, and you get a 55-43 record, good for a .561 win%, which would still have them atop the NL Central. That win% over their total games played would be equivalent of an 83-95 record, just about the same as the Dodgers (84-64) and just behind the Nationals (88-60). So in other words, even with their best two months ignored, this is still a division winning team. Other interesting schedule split info, courtesy of their baseball-reference schedule page... They are 15-5 this season in interleague play (2-2 vs the White Sox and 13-3 vs the AL West). 9-4 in extra innings. And they've been in 50 blowout games (out of 148 total... so about a third of their games total) this season and are 38-12 in those - so they blow teams out about 3x as often as they get blown out, and 40.4% of their wins have come in blowouts. And they're not somehow winning by virtue of random good luck in close games - they're 22-23 in one-run games. Oh, and something really unusual for Cubs fans to enjoy... they've never been under .500, the entire season, not once.
  6. So, there's "personal accolades" and then there's a chance to be one of 24 perfect games EVER in a sport that is over a hundred years old and where there are currently (30x162) 4,860 shots taken at that perfect game every year. Even in Babe Ruth's days the season was 154 games long. You're talking about an unbelievably rare event - the achievement of absolute perfection in a game. That's hardly the same as somebody chasing, say, a 40th HR for the season, or a bonus target driven 40th save or something.
  7. Man, if this happened in July, instead of September when everybody is already turning attention to their fantasy football teams, this would probably have turned into BlisterGate. (Or TenderGate?) Roberts' rep coming into LA was that he's a "player's manager." I'd have to imagine that takes a real ding after this. To his credit, at least he's straight up about his rationale and he's owning it with that quote. I respect him for that even if I completely disagree with his choice.
  8. "Historically bad" - what? Look, a .231/6/42/8 isn't pretty or good or anything else even resembling that, but it's not anywhere near "historical" in its badness. Let's not get carried away,
  9. Ottavino relieved Lyles. 2 2 Posey safe at second on throwing error by shortstop Descalso. 2 2 Pence reached on infield single to shortstop, Posey to third. 2 2 Logan relieved Ottavino. 2 2 Crawford struck out swinging. 2 2 Tomlinson singled to center, Posey scored, Pence to second. 3 2 Yeah, wow. Looks like a really horrible appearance. One error, one infield single. I don't know if he'll ever live that down.
  10. The bottoming out of the SBs has been the real change from his norm.
  11. While I will take no position in the whether WAR is a "good stat" or "bad stat" debate, I will at least submit that the formula is fairly well detailed here:. http://www.fangraphs.com/library/war/war-position-players/ There is a similar page for pitchers as well.
  12. I hear he's pretty good.
  13. Grave concern around breaking balls and thin air, as prior posters have indicated. Avoiding this one for sure, unless I'm in a desperate race that needs some really lucky breaks.
  14. Nobody here gets a vote. Only Weiss does. It's not a question of "calling for" removal, it's a question of predicting it.
  15. .350 and 4 SB in the last week... if that is what we want to call "slumping" I will surely take it.