Marlado Faulkando

Established Members
  • Content Count

    3,157
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    2

Everything posted by Marlado Faulkando

  1. It's the very definition of a cover up. If you play football for 30 yrs, there's a good chance that your body will be completely shot & your brain will be part marshmallow = news flash? If Omalu's research into CTE was redundant because it was public knowledge, then why did the NFL doctors send a letter threatening that they would call his paper fraudulent and ask him to retract it? Why did the league feel it necessary to discredit these findings if they were already universally accepted? http://www.slate.com/articles/sports/sports_nut/2015/12/the_truth_about_will_smith_s_concussion_and_bennet_omalu.html From the article, "the NFL's corrupt administration really did attempt to discredit his research and then for half a decade ignored this important line of inquiry."
  2. Well, the NFL doctors did send Omalu a letter accusing him of fraud and suggesting he should retract his report, which generally results in a Doctor being discredited and losing their license, despite a near consensus agreement now on his findings.What would you call that? It's the very definition of a cover up. If you play football for 30 yrs, there's a good chance that your body will be completely shot & your brain will be part marshmallow = news flash? If Omalu's research into CTE was redundant because it was public knowledge, then why did the NFL doctors send a letter threatening that they would call his paper fraudulent and ask him to retract it? Why did the league feel it necessary to discredit these findings if they were already universally accepted?
  3. Obviously there are some people who don't think there was a cover up. I get it. There are those of us who are obviously very passionate about this sport, and talking about these kinds of consequences for our entertainment is difficult. It says something about us. But we can't ignore it. It exists.
  4. Well, the NFL doctors did send Omalu a letter accusing him of fraud and suggesting he should retract his report, which generally results in a Doctor being discredited and losing their license, despite a near consensus agreement now on his findings. What would you call that?
  5. I get where you're coming from on the general injury risk with football in terms of spinal cord injuries, broken bones, eventual arthritis, etc. Everybody knew those were possible. They were known risks. The concussion aftereffects though just weren't known to the general public when we were kids. The public didn't know that playing football may lead you to want to pull out a shotgun and shoot yourself in the chest like Seau did. Or basically have some of the symptoms of dementia at age 36 like ARE was talking about. Just speaking for myself, when I was 12 years old I never really considered anything bad would happen to me outside of some bruises when I started playing tackle football, nor was I told that would happen. Now, when I started playing and as I progressed through high school those risks became more clear, but by that point you don't want to give up on the team, especially in high school.And never did I consider that I would suffer long term brain trauma for the rest of my life. Maybe you guys thought about that, I don't know. Did you ever consider that spending your life as a paraplegic was a possibility? After playing it for a couple years? Yeah I did. So I did certain things on the field that minimized that risk. It's good to know those sorts of things when you're doing them though. I don't understand how people being aware of the risk of CTE and former players speaking about their experiences is so negative. You're not a "tough guy" just because you're ignorant about what happen to you if you do something.
  6. I get where you're coming from on the general injury risk with football in terms of spinal cord injuries, broken bones, eventual arthritis, etc. Everybody knew those were possible. They were known risks. The concussion aftereffects though just weren't known to the general public when we were kids. The public didn't know that playing football may lead you to want to pull out a shotgun and shoot yourself in the chest like Seau did. Or basically have some of the symptoms of dementia at age 36 like ARE was talking about. Just speaking for myself, when I was 12 years old I never really considered anything bad would happen to me outside of some bruises when I started playing tackle football, nor was I told that would happen. Now, when I started playing and as I progressed through high school those risks became more clear, but by that point you don't want to give up on the team, especially in high school. And never did I consider that I would suffer long term brain trauma for the rest of my life. Maybe you guys thought about that, I don't know.
  7. Fair comparison. Although I don't know the statistics well enough to say whether there is as strong a correlation between playing football and getting CTE as there is of smoking and getting heart disease or lung cancer, and I'd argue that there are better benefits to playing football than smoking. The actuaries hired by the NFL cited a 28% risk of CTE. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/13/sports/football/actuarial-reports-in-nfl-concussion-deal-are-released.html?_r=0 That's nearly three times greater than the chance of getting lung cancer from smoking cigarettes (10%). So based on what we know now, you're MUCH more likely to get CTE from playing in the NFL than you are to get lung cancer from smoking cigarettes. Well. That sucks.
  8. I don't know that this needs to be a generation gap thing. It's pretty much accepted medical science that head injuries caused from playing football result in elevated risks of getting CTE. It's not like when Jonas Salk invented the polio vaccine the old timers went around and said, "darn kids always whining about their polio." I kind of look at football and CTE when ARE was playing like cigarettes pre-1980 or so (minus the marketing to kids angle. The public wasn't aware of the high risk of cancer from smoking years ago. The industry tried to bury the research as long as possible. Now the truth is out and everyone knows the harm that can be done and is aware of it. When ARE started playing the risks of long-term serious brain trauma from playing weren't known. The NFL even tried to bury the research on it. Now, everybody is well aware of said risk. Knowing what everybody knows now, if you want to keep smoking, fine, but don't complain if you get lung cancer. Knowing what everybody knows now, if you want to keep playing football, fine, but don't complain if you get CTE. I don't know that this needs to be a generation gap thing. It's pretty much accepted medical science that head injuries caused from playing football result in elevated risks of getting CTE. It's not like when Jonas Salk invented the polio vaccine the old timers went around and said, "darn kids always whining about their polio." I kind of look at football and CTE when ARE was playing like cigarettes pre-1980 or so (minus the marketing to kids angle. The public wasn't aware of the high risk of cancer from smoking years ago. The industry tried to bury the research as long as possible. Now the truth is out and everyone knows the harm that can be done and is aware of it. When ARE started playing the risks of long-term serious brain trauma from playing weren't known. The NFL even tried to bury the research on it. Now, everybody is well aware of said risk. Knowing what everybody knows now, if you want to keep smoking, fine, but don't complain if you get lung cancer. Knowing what everybody knows now, if you want to keep playing football, fine, but don't complain if you get CTE. Fair comparison. Although I don't know the statistics well enough to say whether there is as strong a correlation between playing football and getting CTE as there is of smoking and getting heart disease or lung cancer, and I'd argue that there are better benefits to playing football than smoking.
  9. I don't know that this needs to be a generation gap thing. It's pretty much accepted medical science that head injuries caused from playing football result in elevated risks of getting CTE. It's not like when Jonas Salk invented the polio vaccine the old timers went around and said, "darn kids always whining about their polio."
  10. Many of us our idiots that have no issue making hypothetical statements that don't impact us in any way. He's 36 and can't walk down stairs. Think about that for a second. I'm in no way attempting to diminish this. I've had concussions playing football. CTE worries me, because I love football, I think it teaches young men a lot of great things about working together as a group, accountability, strength, and resilience. But at what cost? Is this thing really worth it if it is causing these kinds of health risks? IMO, it is, if the people committing themselves to it are aware of the risks. Unlike Randle-El, I probably would go back and play again, even if I knew about the possibilities of CTE. Then again, I didn't play against professional athletes, and I can walk down stairs. I don't know what this will mean for the future of the sport, now that the cat's out of the bag, so to speak. I guess we'll see.