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mr_clutch31

Anybody watched Rockets games yet?

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First of all, did Adelman bring his princeton motion offense along with him to Houston? More importantly, how often does Yao come out of low post?

I just acquired Yao via trades, but I somehow feel he'll have tough time adjusting to the new offense at the beginning. I think he'll make more tunrovers while not getting as many rebounds (from offensive end). You knew they went to Yao everytime with JVG, but now i feel Tmac will be the focal point in the offense.

What do you guys think?

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I haven't, but if memory serves me right they used to post up a decent amount with C-Web back in the day. Completely different situations with supporting casts and I am sure Adelman realizes that. I think Yao's game stays the same for the most part even with the coaching change.

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yao will love adelman's system cuz he wont just be in the low post like with van gundy. they'll use him more on high screens, hand offs and high low action, with yao getting the ball at the FT line. for those of you in TO leagues, that could mean less TOs for yao cuz there wont be as many opportunities for opposing guards to dig down on double teams. i like yao in the princeton offense cuz he'll be far less predictable. it'll take advantage of his shooting ability as well as his underrated passing ability. i think we'll see a small spike in yao's assists this yr as well.

in the princeton offense, the perimeter players are not the focus. alot of it is based a big's ability to pass and shoot.

in short, i like yao's prospects to exceed his previous #s this yr.

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Well another concern i have is, Adelman loves to just attack when the defense is not set, so unless Yao can get up and down the floor quickly (which he sometimes has problems with) he might not even get touches on some positions. I have no doubt that slower pace is better for Yao. On screen n rolls big men really need good hands and must be able to adjust direction/shots quickly. I don't think Yao is best at those.

You mentioned princeton offense' focus is bigs - but actually, princeton offense' focus is guards. It allows guards to get closer to the basket with backdoor cuts. Big men who can shoot and pass just HELP work out the offense better by stretching out the floor therefore making more open spaces downlow. A lot of people just remember Sacto and how their big men were involved in priceton all the time. But remember other teams who run this offense - NJ and Washington, both perimeter oriented teams.

Yao can shoot so that means Adelman would be tempted to bring him out of low post more often. I feel that would translate to less offensive boards and put backs for him, and more TOs until he adjusts to that roll. I just hope Adelman doesn't bring Yao far out of the post. As Mustache mentioned I hope Yao's game stays the same and it's just tweaks and wrinkles that Adelman adds to the system.

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I have watched 2 of the games. Yao plays a lot of high post now too. If there is anything else u wanna know ask me!

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I haven't watched the games, but I think Adelman will adjust his coaching style to fit Yao's style of play as much as Yao will adjust to Adelman.

He is their number 1 weapon and I don't see that changing. I can see him getting some more assists because we know that is a method Adelman uses, but remember that shot blocking and quality rebounding are a major key to fast break offense. I don't think we will be looking at a milk the clock team like Van Gundy's but I also don't see Sacto part duex either.

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First of all, did Adelman bring his princeton motion offense along with him to Houston? More importantly, how often does Yao come out of low post?

I just acquired Yao via trades, but I somehow feel he'll have tough time adjusting to the new offense at the beginning. I think he'll make more tunrovers while not getting as many rebounds (from offensive end). You knew they went to Yao everytime with JVG, but now i feel Tmac will be the focal point in the offense.

What do you guys think?

edit - answer confirmed

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Well another concern i have is, Adelman loves to just attack when the defense is not set, so unless Yao can get up and down the floor quickly (which he sometimes has problems with) he might not even get touches on some positions. I have no doubt that slower pace is better for Yao. On screen n rolls big men really need good hands and must be able to adjust direction/shots quickly. I don't think Yao is best at those.

You mentioned princeton offense' focus is bigs - but actually, princeton offense' focus is guards. It allows guards to get closer to the basket with backdoor cuts. Big men who can shoot and pass just HELP work out the offense better by stretching out the floor therefore making more open spaces downlow. A lot of people just remember Sacto and how their big men were involved in priceton all the time. But remember other teams who run this offense - NJ and Washington, both perimeter oriented teams.

Yao can shoot so that means Adelman would be tempted to bring him out of low post more often. I feel that would translate to less offensive boards and put backs for him, and more TOs until he adjusts to that roll. I just hope Adelman doesn't bring Yao far out of the post. As Mustache mentioned I hope Yao's game stays the same and it's just tweaks and wrinkles that Adelman adds to the system.

I recall Webber and then Brad Miller being the key components (greatest benes) of that offense in Sac....

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Well another concern i have is, Adelman loves to just attack when the defense is not set, so unless Yao can get up and down the floor quickly (which he sometimes has problems with) he might not even get touches on some positions. I have no doubt that slower pace is better for Yao. On screen n rolls big men really need good hands and must be able to adjust direction/shots quickly. I don't think Yao is best at those.

You mentioned princeton offense' focus is bigs - but actually, princeton offense' focus is guards. It allows guards to get closer to the basket with backdoor cuts. Big men who can shoot and pass just HELP work out the offense better by stretching out the floor therefore making more open spaces downlow. A lot of people just remember Sacto and how their big men were involved in priceton all the time. But remember other teams who run this offense - NJ and Washington, both perimeter oriented teams.

Yao can shoot so that means Adelman would be tempted to bring him out of low post more often. I feel that would translate to less offensive boards and put backs for him, and more TOs until he adjusts to that roll. I just hope Adelman doesn't bring Yao far out of the post. As Mustache mentioned I hope Yao's game stays the same and it's just tweaks and wrinkles that Adelman adds to the system.

-adelman's offense isnt as fast-paced as one would assume. it just leads to alot of points cuz of how efficient it is when executed properly. if you think about the kings in their hayday they didnt really have that many athletes who could get up and down the floor, the most athletic guy they had on their team was like doug christie or bobby jackson. i would consider vlade or b-miller gazelles runnin the floor

-NJ and WAS are only princeton offenses in name. watch them execute and its nothing like the princeton offense other than the occcasional backdoor. they're both isolation based with NJ using more screen and roll.

-i think it'll be great for yao's game if he's moved all over the paint. i especially like the fact that he'll be shooting more standstill face up jumpers, cuz that means less fadeaways. yao shoots too many of those from the post.

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I recall Webber and then Brad Miller being the key components (greatest benes) of that offense in Sac....

Yes as I mentioned on the following sentences. That was either Adelman or Pete Carrill recognizing that those big men were gonna make the princeton motion more effective. But originally princeton motion is designed for teams with no low post threats, and the focus is to get open with backdoor cuts. You will see Wizards players making handoff passes around the perimeter until one guy either cuts backdoor or attacks the defense one-on-one. That's probably the purest form you'll see. With Webber and Divac it was an hybrid - high post princeton offense.

Well before going off topic even more, the key with those two bigs was that they can shoot (so opponent centers must get out of the key to guard them, opening more room for backdoor cuts) and they can pass (make backdoor passes efficiently). Also Webber could dribble into the lane by himself. Yao can shoot but not sure if he got other skills to excel at this type of offense. He's definitely better to stay put downlow IMO.

Finally, I'd consider Adelman's offense still "fast" because he lets guys to attack at will before the defense sets up (so rather than calling plays every single time). Fast doesn't mean how fast you run, but how fast you score. B)

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Yes as I mentioned on the following sentences. That was either Adelman or Pete Carrill recognizing that those big men were gonna make the princeton motion more effective. But originally princeton motion is designed for teams with no low post threats, and the focus is to get open with backdoor cuts. You will see Wizards players making handoff passes around the perimeter until one guy either cuts backdoor or attacks the defense one-on-one. That's probably the purest form you'll see. With Webber and Divac it was an hybrid - high post princeton offense.

Well before going off topic even more, the key with those two bigs was that they can shoot (so opponent centers must get out of the key to guard them, opening more room for backdoor cuts) and they can pass (make backdoor passes efficiently). Also Webber could dribble into the lane by himself. Yao can shoot but not sure if he got other skills to excel at this type of offense. He's definitely better to stay put downlow IMO.

Finally, I'd consider Adelman's offense still "fast" because he lets guys to attack at will before the defense sets up (so rather than calling plays every single time). Fast doesn't mean how fast you run, but how fast you score. B)

-a princeton offense is a princeton offense, those big man principals are consistent throughout. NJ and WAS just dont have the personnel to execute that part of it. if any team uses a hybrid its NJ and WAS cuz they only use princeton principals occasionally, other than that they're pretty much a typical unimaginative iso based offense that runs out whenever they can.

-yao is a very underrated passer. how are teams gonna take away a 7'5 guy poppin jumpers like a game of pop a shot with the threat of a hand off drive or backdoor cutters? you rarely see a team doubling the high post especially with another big cuz that would leave the basket open.

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-a princeton offense is a princeton offense, those big man principals are consistent throughout. NJ and WAS just dont have the personnel to execute that part of it. if any team uses a hybrid its NJ and WAS cuz they only use princeton principals occasionally, other than that they're pretty much a typical unimaginative iso based offense that runs out whenever they can.

-yao is a very underrated passer. how are teams gonna take away a 7'5 guy poppin jumpers like a game of pop a shot with the threat of a hand off drive or backdoor cutters? you rarely see a team doubling the high post especially with another big cuz that would leave the basket open.

I agree your point about not being able to double him, but i ahven't yet to see him as a good passer. I guess we'll find out this season.

And again about the princeton offense. The key is constantly sharing the ball and cutting toward basket in order to get easy baskets. Big men are just added as a playmaker if they have the skills to do so. Kings was more like a high post motion offense with Princeton wrinkles. Or you could say other way around - Princeton motion with high post option. Remember it was first used at Princeton U i heard at that time they had no athletes or skillfull bigmen. It was for players with good fundamentals and good decision making abilities but lacked individual offensive skills (i.e. one-on-one penetration).

Nets did use to use it a lot on their glory days. Wizards still use it a lot, even in crunch time. (I remember one from last years highlights where Butler tied the game with double backdoor cuts near the end of regulation)

I'll add more: it's an offense based on reading the defense rather than calling out plays. So you'll less likely notice it being "implemented." Players just do it as those cuts and passes become accustomed to be their playing style.

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I agree your point about not being able to double him, but i ahven't yet to see him as a good passer. I guess we'll find out this season.

And again about the princeton offense. The key is constantly sharing the ball and cutting toward basket in order to get easy baskets. Big men are just added as a playmaker if they have the skills to do so. Kings was more like a high post motion offense with Princeton wrinkles. Or you could say other way around - Princeton motion with high post option. Remember it was first used at Princeton U i heard at that time they had no athletes or skillfull bigmen. It was for players with good fundamentals and good decision making abilities but lacked individual offensive skills (i.e. one-on-one penetration).

Nets did use to use it a lot on their glory days. Wizards still use it a lot, even in crunch time. (I remember one from last years highlights where Butler tied the game with double backdoor cuts near the end of regulation)

I'll add more: it's an offense based on reading the defense rather than calling out plays. So you'll less likely notice it being "implemented." Players just do it as those cuts and passes become accustomed to be their playing style.

fran fraschilla breaks down the princeton offense

http://espn.go.com/ncb/2003/0304/1517990.html

http://espn.go.com/ncb/2003/0312/1522592.html

the center is like a hub, everybody works and moves around him. he's the primary playmaker.

yao's already shown me he's a very good passer. van gundy's offense was just too predictable and stagnant to take advantage of his skill.

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Yup i saw that one before - again i did mention that center could be the playmaker IF they have those skills. But my belief is that Yao is a low post scorer rather than a playmaker.

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Yao fatigue and lack of speed should be a concern for the offense that Adelman's offense. That's just me.

Saying this, I am both a Yao fan and owner

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