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Tdavis20

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Actaully research has shown that cardio BEFORE the workout is actually more beneficial. Because what happens is that when you do cardio your heart rate goes up, so after its up, when you lift weights it keeps that heart rate up. Where as if you do weights then do cardio after your cardio your body goes back to resting metabolic rate when you don't do anything, so you don't keep that sustained energy burn...

But it depends on what intensity your cardio workout is. Your cardio in theory should only be 60-75% of your max heart rate... if you are going above that you're working too hard cause you burn yourself out faster.

Optimal work out regime is do cardio for 10-15 mins where you're working at 60-75% of your max heart rate (usually measured by 220-your age, ex. I'm 25 so my max HR is 195... I should be doing cardio where my HR is around the 120 range...), do some weights, pop back on cardio again for 5-10 at 50-60% MHR, second set of muscles then finish off with more cardio where you can push yourself a bit more at 75-80% MHR.

I agree on the cardio first approach.

I usually do the stair master machine before I start lifting when I go to the gym. Typically do 100 flights in 16-18 minutes depending on the intensity. Gives you a great sweat heading into lifting. I usually do cardio 5 times a week on top of playing beer league softball haha.

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This past week I was reading in article in a fitness magazine regarding a workout club called CrossFit that focuses on pushing your body to it's limits. Focuses on core exercises like pull-ups, push-ups and sprints with an obscene amount of reps. I do my share of lifting and running but I'm nowhere in the range of these gurus. I left a link above that lists their exrcises (if that's allowed.)

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Muscle MIlk is disgusting. I mean it tastes good but that stuff is so fattening. It made me feel so sick after I worked out and drank that, I wanted to throw up.

Ive used almost everything out there protein wise, Ive used the GNC brand WHEY protein and I liked that, Muscle MIlk was gross, I went to Smoothie king alot for my shakes but that got real expensive so I dont do that anymore plus they can be fattening unless you get the right drink. Now I take Advocare (I think you have to know someone that sells it, like you cant buy it at a store or off the internet I dont think) and I love it. Im in my senior year right now, but I took this stuff my freshman year (I weighed like 130) and my bench was like 95 lbs going into football season and I left doing like 115-120. Now Im a senior but I dont work out as much as I used to. Ive just now started going back and Im going to ask my football coach for a good workout plan. I do different muscle groups every day like Chest and Tri's then Back and Bi's then shoulders and abs and then legs. I also run for 10 mins before I work out as a warm up so that looks like it is helping. I weight 170-175 and I can bench probably around 200 (that was my max like 2 months ago and havent worked out alot since so it is probably down) but I will update on my workout routine as much as I can and tell you any workouts that I like and if they work well for me.

1) Muscle Milk is for hard gainers, not hard losers. Look for low-cal protein.

2) GNC is a ripoff, look for online retailers - basically anything GNC branded is repackaged and marked up. I'm not talking about saving like 10% either - I'm talking 50-75%. I only go there if I'm in a pinch and absolutely HAVE to have something. Optimum Nutrition 100% is the best iv'e seen - Grab one of those bigass containers of Whey for PWO shakes (post-workout) and a bigass container of casein for shake before bed - of course, making sure your diet is adjusted for the added caloric intake (should be 220 per day of the top of my head).

That'll help you get your muscles rebuilt and hopefully get your body adjusted to burn fat more efficiently (instead of burning muscle) when you work out.

Gotlaid, thanks for the cardio info - I'm going to adjust my cardio to be in the mornings rather than at night. How has that affected your results? Also, are you a hard gainer or a hard loser?

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1) Muscle Milk is for hard gainers, not hard losers. Look for low-cal protein.

2) GNC is a ripoff, look for online retailers - basically anything GNC branded is repackaged and marked up. I'm not talking about saving like 10% either - I'm talking 50-75%. I only go there if I'm in a pinch and absolutely HAVE to have something. Optimum Nutrition 100% is the best iv'e seen - Grab one of those bigass containers of Whey for PWO shakes (post-workout) and a bigass container of casein for shake before bed - of course, making sure your diet is adjusted for the added caloric intake (should be 220 per day of the top of my head).

That'll help you get your muscles rebuilt and hopefully get your body adjusted to burn fat more efficiently (instead of burning muscle) when you work out.

Gotlaid, thanks for the cardio info - I'm going to adjust my cardio to be in the mornings rather than at night. How has that affected your results? Also, are you a hard gainer or a hard loser?

I'd guess loser by his performance in our Rotowood League B)

I myself am not into gaining. Trying to tone more less for summer. Got to impress the ladies and show them where the beach is haha.

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I'd guess loser by his performance in our Rotowood League B)

I myself am not into gaining. Trying to tone more less for summer. Got to impress the ladies and show them where the beach is haha.

I hear that! I'm a hard loser so toning is incredibly difficult, and i hate cardio, so that doesn't help things.

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I just started running before working out like 2 weeks ago and at first I didnt like it, but now I HAVE to do it. Its weird, I usually hate running. I forgot to ask my football coach about a workout routine but Ill try to tomorrow.

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I just started running before working out like 2 weeks ago and at first I didnt like it, but now I HAVE to do it. Its weird, I usually hate running. I forgot to ask my football coach about a workout routine but Ill try to tomorrow.

A good friend of mine who is a bodybuilder told me that you run before lifting if you want to look like a runner and run after lifting if you want to look like a lifter. Maybe you guys can fill me in on your experience as far as progress.

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Yeah thats what I plan on doing, im going to update on how much my weight goes up and all that. Im hoping to gain 10-15 pounds by August and weigh 185-190 so I can play Club baseball at LSU or even try out for the baseball team (wont make it though ha) But yea like someone has already said, running before working out increases your heart rate so when your lifting your going to get the Max out of your workout

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A good friend of mine who is a bodybuilder told me that you run before lifting if you want to look like a runner and run after lifting if you want to look like a lifter. Maybe you guys can fill me in on your experience as far as progress.

I've been lifting heavily for over ten years and I agree with your friend. If you're looking to gain muscle mass, you shouldn't be doing more than twenty minutes of intense cardio more than three times a week.

I've been cutting pretty hard for my trip to Vegas and HIIT(high intensity interval training) has made me lose a decent amount of strength and muscle mass. Even though I've lost some thickness in my upper body, the actual muscle looks a lot bigger. It's really not fun, but its worth it to look good in a bathing suit though.

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I would recommend cardio after your resistive training, especially if its muscle mass that is your top priority. Now, a light jog, or something like that before lifting is good. You want your body core temp to be somewhat up when lifting. Always try to get a few warm-up sets in before doing your working sets. Any day(s) you do legs, I would definitely do cardio after lifting. Stick with the cardio by all means, but just realize you need more caloric intake because of that.

Another big thing in aquiring muscle mass is you have to get a gram of protein per lb. of your weight..ie, you wiegh 150=you need at least 150 g. of protein. Remember your body can really only use about 30-40 g. of protein per setting. So that means getting like 5-6 servings of protein @ 30-40 per day....even on your days off. Trust me, it makes a huge difference. Good luck and remember to use good form as compared to using heavy weights. Once you start making gains it gets really fun

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This past week I was reading in article in a fitness magazine regarding a workout club called CrossFit that focuses on pushing your body to it's limits. Focuses on core exercises like pull-ups, push-ups and sprints with an obscene amount of reps. I do my share of lifting and running but I'm nowhere in the range of these gurus. I left a link above that lists their exrcises (if that's allowed.)

It depends on what you want entirely from your workout. Usually high rep low weight workouts are meant for more muscular endurance than size. I mean it's pretty obvious right, if you look at athletes who do repetitive activities like cross-country running, swimming, soccer they tend to be more smaller but ripped type of athletes... because those athletes tend to want their muscles to be more efficient than getting bulky.

If you want more of a real life example... like construction workers most of them are fairly big guys, why cause they lift heavy objects all day long.... bicycle messengers are thinner because they're constantly riding their bikes... so naturally your body accommodates for what you do in your daily life

If you are a weightlifter or bodybuilder and want to lift heavier objects then your body will accommodate for that by wanting more bulk.

Basically its how you shape your workout that will determine your outcome. You can do 100 pullups and that leads to endurance, or you can tack on 100 kgs on a weight belt and you do 5 pullups to build muscular strength. I mean its the same activity just how you use it.

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1) Muscle Milk is for hard gainers, not hard losers. Look for low-cal protein.

2) GNC is a ripoff, look for online retailers - basically anything GNC branded is repackaged and marked up. I'm not talking about saving like 10% either - I'm talking 50-75%. I only go there if I'm in a pinch and absolutely HAVE to have something. Optimum Nutrition 100% is the best iv'e seen - Grab one of those bigass containers of Whey for PWO shakes (post-workout) and a bigass container of casein for shake before bed - of course, making sure your diet is adjusted for the added caloric intake (should be 220 per day of the top of my head).

That'll help you get your muscles rebuilt and hopefully get your body adjusted to burn fat more efficiently (instead of burning muscle) when you work out.

Gotlaid, thanks for the cardio info - I'm going to adjust my cardio to be in the mornings rather than at night. How has that affected your results? Also, are you a hard gainer or a hard loser?

I'm not a hardcore work out maniac cause I've entered the real-world of working fulltime and I don't have as much free time as I did back in Uni days where I could do 2 hours of workouts a day at Uni... but I mean it makes sense, sometimes the simplest solution that makes sense works best. Like if you do cardio first it just gets your heartrate up and the more activities you do you keep it up... where as if you do cardio last and then you get changed head home and sit on the couch that doesn't really give you sustained energy burn does it?

I think it depends on what you want to do or what your goals are. To me it kinda naturally goes both ways no matter what you want its just that you can put more emphasis on one over the other. For instance if you want to gain bulk you naturally kinda wanna lose the fat too to give you the cut in your muscles... and the only way you are gonna lose that fat is if you do cardio. If you don't and you just do weights you end up looking like offensive linemen or D-line... you have the big muscle underneath but you can't see it cause its covered by fat, which is pointless in my opinion. And it kinda works the other way too, if you are a hard loser you kinda wanna build up that muscle mass too so that way you have more "factories" to help you burn off that fat. So I don't think its optimal to just say I'm gonna be a hard loser or a hard gainer, you kinda wanna do a bit of both. I mean you can certainly say I wanna focus on being a hard loser but still tack on some weight work too. Or I wanna be a gainer but I wanna throw in some cardio too.

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I hear that! I'm a hard loser so toning is incredibly difficult, and i hate cardio, so that doesn't help things.

You're kinda screwing yourself then. Getting toned is opposite of many people beleive, YOU DON'T NEED BIG MUSCLES TO GET TONED! I kinda hate to sterotype a particular race, but African Americans tend to be more ripped than Caucasian Americans why? It's not because they have more muscle mass than than Caucasians, but it due to the LOW PERCENTAGE OF BODY FAT. If you look at cross country runners, swimmers, or tennis players. They're pretty defined because of their low percentage of body fat, not really because of their huge bulking muscles.

So I mean the best way to get yourself definition is to burn off as much fat as possible. And the best way to do it is cardio. Cardio isn't necessarily just treadmill, stairclimber, or elipitical work, I mean its simple stuff that gets you using your muscles for a sustained period of time. Go out and ride a bike, shooting hoops, swim at a pool, tennis, even 18 holes of golf, jumping jacks... as long as you're body is moving and you're using your muscles thats cardio. Hell walking to the fridge and picking up a beer is cardio if you do it 100 times in a few hours (granted it goes to waste if you offset that by drinking the beer) But yeah basically the more fat your burn the more definition will show pretty simple concept.

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Yeah thats what I plan on doing, im going to update on how much my weight goes up and all that. Im hoping to gain 10-15 pounds by August and weigh 185-190 so I can play Club baseball at LSU or even try out for the baseball team (wont make it though ha) But yea like someone has already said, running before working out increases your heart rate so when your lifting your going to get the Max out of your workout

Hmmm let me explain it through some basic math. Say you do weights and it burns 200 kCal in your workout, then you get on a treadmill at the end of your workout you burn 400 kCal after 20 minutes of jogging... you go change, sit in your car and then head home and go to bed or sit on a couch... so you might burn 50 kCal after your workout...

So that works out to be around 750 kCal?

If you do Cardio before your workout (same length and intensity) you still burn the same 400 kCal but now you do your weights and because your heart rate is still fairly high you do weights to keep that heart rate up so you still do the 200 kCal workout but because your heart rate is still elevated from your cardio you might burn an extra 75 kCal, post-workout remains the same... another 50 kCal

So this workout you're looking at 825 kCal.. so you burn off an extra 75 kCal... So that's almost equivalent to an extra 4 minutes of cardio work... Also the fact that once you do cardio your brain releases endorphins too (runner's high if a few of you guys have heard it) Those hormones basically make you "more happy" so what that can aide in is that it helps you lift more too. Instead of repping 20's you might be more inclined to rep 25's or 30's so that helps in the weights program as well.

So I mean if you have buds that have done it stick with their program cause if it works for them great, I'm just kinda explaining the scientific side of it for you as to why it would make more sense to do it prior workout than post. If you're happy with post stick with post. If you're doing post and wondering why its not working try changing it up!

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I would recommend cardio after your resistive training, especially if its muscle mass that is your top priority. Now, a light jog, or something like that before lifting is good. You want your body core temp to be somewhat up when lifting. Always try to get a few warm-up sets in before doing your working sets. Any day(s) you do legs, I would definitely do cardio after lifting. Stick with the cardio by all means, but just realize you need more caloric intake because of that.

Another big thing in aquiring muscle mass is you have to get a gram of protein per lb. of your weight..ie, you wiegh 150=you need at least 150 g. of protein. Remember your body can really only use about 30-40 g. of protein per setting. So that means getting like 5-6 servings of protein @ 30-40 per day....even on your days off. Trust me, it makes a huge difference. Good luck and remember to use good form as compared to using heavy weights. Once you start making gains it gets really fun

That might be too much I think... But that was back in 2004 when I took exercise physiology at Uni they told me 0.8 per kg not lbs. Which means at 150 you're looking at roughly 55 grams of protein, say we double it so 110 even seems a bit of a stretch. 150 seems a way way way excessive to me.

http://www.dietitian.com/protein.html

Roughly half way down it recommends 63 grams as the RDA (recommended daily allowance)

The thing with protein is that there isn't significant data to show that taking protein alone helps build muscle mass. Or else everyone would be buying those protein powders and getting big off of them just by drinking protein shakes. It's a combination of both protein intake and workout regime that will determine what works and what doesn't. The problem with the research is that we can't tell if its the protein that improves the muscle development or is it the workout regime?

The thing with the research is that increased protein intake does not show significant improvement in muscle development alone, what research has shown is that your kidney faces significant problems if it is forced to break down too much protein for a extended period of time.

Imagine your kidneys as a toll booth. On one side it is protein when it passes the toll booth it gets turned into amino acids which your body can then use to rebuild muscles. Now imagine if you had 50 cars lined up waiting to be processed... ok takes an hour bada bing bada boom job done... now what if you increased your intake of protein... now you got 500 cars lined up waiting to be processed.... ok now it takes 10 hours to process, of course if you look at how a toll booth operator operates probably fairly productive for the first hour on the job, but after 10 hours of processing they get pissed off an angry too. Well same with your kidneys, the more work they have to do the more wear and tear they get. Now it might be ok if you do it maybe once a week.. but if you keep sustaining that pressure for weeks and months at a time somethings gotta give right?

So moral of the story, taking extra protein MAY slightly help in your muscle development, but it certainly causes more problems for your kidneys than it's worth...

However I will point out that you made a great suggestion is that you want to spread out the protein consumption. You mentioned that at a setting you should only take in 30-40 grams of protein thats a great suggestion because that creates less backlog in your "toll booths". Which is why you see a lot of bodybuilder eat those small cans of tuna or salmon throughout the day because that gives them the protein at regular intervals. What I see a big problem with are those big giant hulking tubs of whey protein mixes. What people do is drink a shake of that stuff and that gives a massive jolt of protein infusion into the body (if there really is protein in there... I think if someone actually did a protein test in those tubs it would be significantly lower amount of protein than as advertised on the label, so you're basically paying for muck...) so I mean we talked a bit about the backlog of protein processing... well what happens if you suddenly launched 10,000 cars at the toll booth?

I recognize I'm speaking contrary to the popular muscle mags and a few people out there might be like who's this guy trying to tell me opposite of what muscle mags tell me to do, but hear me out... Guess how those mags make their money? through sponsors... who are the sponsors? chemical companies that supply supplements... How do those chemical companies make money to advertise in those mags or for their shareholders? they sell more product... What helps sell more product? two simple words "research says" Well if "research says" sells products, how can we attach evidence in our ads? Hire some research scientists who will doctor the numbers to what we want, hey they want to get paid too don't they... Hire a fat dude for a before picture, hire a ripped dude, that has probably been working out for the past 10 years of his life, for an after picture... stick on some doctored evidence stating that it works stick it in the newest Men's Muscle mag... bada bing bada boom, flocks of unsuspecting males see the product at the local GNC that they read about in the mag splurge 50-100 bucks on a tub of stuff that probably is as beneficial as a cardboard box. Chemical company gets rich, unsuspecting male ends up quitting the workout regime in a month anyways...

I've got no vested interest in going against the major corporations here, I'm just passing on the info that I received when I took a course in exercise physiology at Uni a few years ago and hoping to clear up some common misconceptions that are out there. I mean you guys are part of the Rotoworld community and I'd rather give you guys good advice than for you guys to run out there and spend a bill or 2 on something that might not even be benefitting you.

If you guys want more info on program planning and stuff I can help you out a bit more just leave a msg here or PM me. I'll try my best to do what I can.

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everything you just said makes so much sense

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I think my main problem is I dont get enough protein and Im not eating like I should be. I dont eat terrible, but I dont eat awesome either.

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I think my main problem is I dont get enough protein and Im not eating like I should be. I dont eat terrible, but I dont eat awesome either.

That is true - most people don't get enough protein in their diet.

I'm trying to add a protein source to each meal i eat (I eat about 5 times a day). There are elements to nutrient timing as well, which is why people do the protein as a PWO shake (you generally want to keep your muscle mass, and protein is the macro that does that - otherwise all you are doing is breaking down muscle everytime you work out). I'm also trying to get my calories consistent w/ my activity level - I have a feeling I'm way way lower than I should be.

@Gotlaid, regarding BF and race, there is no correlation between it. There are some genetic things that make it better for some people than others, but it's not race related.

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I think my main problem is I dont get enough protein and Im not eating like I should be. I dont eat terrible, but I dont eat awesome either.

pasta has a ton of protien and isnt too filling so you can have a lot of it at one time. Works for me, but then again, Im a runner so im not lookin for a "build".

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pasta has a ton of protien and isnt too filling so you can have a lot of it at one time. Works for me, but then again, Im a runner so im not lookin for a "build".

Even the best whole-wheat pasta only has 7.5g of protein, and you're consuming 37.2g of carbs with that! As a runner, that is a great source of energy for a refeed, but protein? Not so much. Meats like chicken, turkey and fish are the best, with low counts of good fat.

Low-carb (not no-carb) is good for cutting fat. Again, comes down to your goals. If you're a runner and you're running like 10 miles a day or something, then yes, you will need a higher carb count (higher cal count overall, in reality) or you'll end up hurting yourself.

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Even the best whole-wheat pasta only has 7.5g of protein, and you're consuming 37.2g of carbs with that! As a runner, that is a great source of energy for a refeed, but protein? Not so much. Meats like chicken, turkey and fish are the best, with low counts of good fat.

Low-carb (not no-carb) is good for cutting fat. Again, comes down to your goals. If you're a runner and you're running like 10 miles a day or something, then yes, you will need a higher carb count (higher cal count overall, in reality) or you'll end up hurting yourself.

8g of protien for 1 serving, 1 box has 8 servings, i usually kill the enitre thing in like 40 mins, that's 72 grams which is 142% of your daily value.

But hey im no expert, maybe my method is just good for lean muscle since i am a runner n all.

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That might be too much I think... But that was back in 2004 when I took exercise physiology at Uni they told me 0.8 per kg not lbs. Which means at 150 you're looking at roughly 55 grams of protein, say we double it so 110 even seems a bit of a stretch. 150 seems a way way way excessive to me.

http://www.dietitian.com/protein.html

Roughly half way down it recommends 63 grams as the RDA (recommended daily allowance)

The thing with protein is that there isn't significant data to show that taking protein alone helps build muscle mass. Or else everyone would be buying those protein powders and getting big off of them just by drinking protein shakes. It's a combination of both protein intake and workout regime that will determine what works and what doesn't. The problem with the research is that we can't tell if its the protein that improves the muscle development or is it the workout regime?

The thing with the research is that increased protein intake does not show significant improvement in muscle development alone, what research has shown is that your kidney faces significant problems if it is forced to break down too much protein for a extended period of time.

Imagine your kidneys as a toll booth. On one side it is protein when it passes the toll booth it gets turned into amino acids which your body can then use to rebuild muscles. Now imagine if you had 50 cars lined up waiting to be processed... ok takes an hour bada bing bada boom job done... now what if you increased your intake of protein... now you got 500 cars lined up waiting to be processed.... ok now it takes 10 hours to process, of course if you look at how a toll booth operator operates probably fairly productive for the first hour on the job, but after 10 hours of processing they get pissed off an angry too. Well same with your kidneys, the more work they have to do the more wear and tear they get. Now it might be ok if you do it maybe once a week.. but if you keep sustaining that pressure for weeks and months at a time somethings gotta give right?

So moral of the story, taking extra protein MAY slightly help in your muscle development, but it certainly causes more problems for your kidneys than it's worth...

However I will point out that you made a great suggestion is that you want to spread out the protein consumption. You mentioned that at a setting you should only take in 30-40 grams of protein thats a great suggestion because that creates less backlog in your "toll booths". Which is why you see a lot of bodybuilder eat those small cans of tuna or salmon throughout the day because that gives them the protein at regular intervals. What I see a big problem with are those big giant hulking tubs of whey protein mixes. What people do is drink a shake of that stuff and that gives a massive jolt of protein infusion into the body (if there really is protein in there... I think if someone actually did a protein test in those tubs it would be significantly lower amount of protein than as advertised on the label, so you're basically paying for muck...) so I mean we talked a bit about the backlog of protein processing... well what happens if you suddenly launched 10,000 cars at the toll booth?

I recognize I'm speaking contrary to the popular muscle mags and a few people out there might be like who's this guy trying to tell me opposite of what muscle mags tell me to do, but hear me out... Guess how those mags make their money? through sponsors... who are the sponsors? chemical companies that supply supplements... How do those chemical companies make money to advertise in those mags or for their shareholders? they sell more product... What helps sell more product? two simple words "research says" Well if "research says" sells products, how can we attach evidence in our ads? Hire some research scientists who will doctor the numbers to what we want, hey they want to get paid too don't they... Hire a fat dude for a before picture, hire a ripped dude, that has probably been working out for the past 10 years of his life, for an after picture... stick on some doctored evidence stating that it works stick it in the newest Men's Muscle mag... bada bing bada boom, flocks of unsuspecting males see the product at the local GNC that they read about in the mag splurge 50-100 bucks on a tub of stuff that probably is as beneficial as a cardboard box. Chemical company gets rich, unsuspecting male ends up quitting the workout regime in a month anyways...

I've got no vested interest in going against the major corporations here, I'm just passing on the info that I received when I took a course in exercise physiology at Uni a few years ago and hoping to clear up some common misconceptions that are out there. I mean you guys are part of the Rotoworld community and I'd rather give you guys good advice than for you guys to run out there and spend a bill or 2 on something that might not even be benefitting you.

If you guys want more info on program planning and stuff I can help you out a bit more just leave a msg here or PM me. I'll try my best to do what I can.

i forgot the stuff from my exercise phys course B) ....you are probably correct in most of your thoughts...here is a little blurb

Although strength training can be extremely intense, each bout is very brief, making it very unlikely that amino acid oxidation will play an important role in providing energy for this type of anaerobic exercise. Carbohydrates are the major fuel for this type of exercise. For this reason, if you train heavily with weights, you need to consume sufficient dietary carbohydrates to provide energy for this high-intensity exercise. However, published results suggest that additional dietary protein can enhance strength gains as well. In one study, five subjects who consumed diets consisting of 0.8 g/kg of body weight per day of protein and adequate calorie intake experienced decreased muscle cell mass over six weeks of strength training. With continued training and an increase in protein intake to 1.6 g/kg, cell mass increased. A nitrogen balance study of bodybuilders demonstrated an increased protein need relative to controls and estimated the RDA for bodybuilders to be 1.7 g/kg total. In another study, impressive strength gains of 5% and size of 6% were observed over several months of strength training in world-class weight lifters when they increased their dietary protein from 1.8 to 3.5 g/kg of body weight per day.

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I think my main problem is I dont get enough protein and Im not eating like I should be. I dont eat terrible, but I dont eat awesome either.

Diets depend entirely on what you want... if you are looking to cut body fat, its best to consume less than your burn, so your body is forced to burn off reserves... If you read those muscle mags and you see massive bodybuilders eat like 4,000 or 5,000 kCal a day their body is trained to burn off that much after years and years of training your body isn't adapted to doing that... so what works for them won't work for you.

If you are a newb to just working out, just go after a 2,000 kCal diet. Its a bit of work but if you just google it theres plenty of suggestions for meals for a 2,000 kcal diet. If you are looking to increase protein look for canned fish those little 200 g tins you can get at the supermarket and eat one every 3-4 hours, so you get that sustained protein intake. It's much better than buying a tub of whey protein and jolting your body with one big jolt of it. Just read that toll booth post I made earlier...

Diet just makes life easier for you. The numbers are this, if you want to lose a kg in two weeks of fat you need to burn off 3,850 kcal per week. It's simple math really. If you eat 7,500 kcal per week, you need to burn off 11,350 kcal... if you eat 10,000 kcal you need to burn off 13,850. If you eat 20,000 kcal you need to burn off 23,850 its fairly simple. Easiest way just eat less so you have to do less work. It's much easier to burn off 11,350 kcal than to burn off 23,850...

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That is true - most people don't get enough protein in their diet.

I'm trying to add a protein source to each meal i eat (I eat about 5 times a day). There are elements to nutrient timing as well, which is why people do the protein as a PWO shake (you generally want to keep your muscle mass, and protein is the macro that does that - otherwise all you are doing is breaking down muscle everytime you work out). I'm also trying to get my calories consistent w/ my activity level - I have a feeling I'm way way lower than I should be.

@Gotlaid, regarding BF and race, there is no correlation between it. There are some genetic things that make it better for some people than others, but it's not race related.

no no for sure it's not race related but like you mentioned it does have to do with genetics... and it goes way back to times of slavery. I mean when african americans were selected as slaves they go after the bigger ones, so generally speaking the african americans who were victims of slavery are genetically predisposed to muscular development than perhaps their white counter parts. So I mean it is kinda stereotype but there is a scientific basis for that stereotype.

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