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Nthayer1408

Drafting WR/RB from the same team.

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What is everyones thoughts on drafting a RB and WR from the same team? Hopkins is one of my three keepers in my PPR league, and I have the opportunity to take Miller in the first round, as he looks to be getting a big workload and a potential top 5 finish this season, if he stays healthy and all that. I've historically avoided drafting different positions from the same team, but there may be enough incentive to take a chance on having these two players. Thanks in advance for the help. 

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2 minutes ago, bhawks489 said:

Yeah I wouldn't pass up the #1 rb. Grab miller.


Thats my initial thought process, but Lacy is sitting right next to him and I have considered taking a chance on him as well. Lacy has the contract year and looks to be in much better shape, could be a great season for him. However, I always come back to Millers opportunity in Houston.

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Nothing wrong with drafting/owning a WR & RB who play on the same team. You'll get more points between them for you're team during the week. 

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It's risky, but the only time I'd ever consider it is if I know it's coming from an elite offense that will have consistent scoring opportunities game to game (Lev Bell + Brown, for example).    

At this moment, the Texans offense has a lot of question marks and variables entering the season.   Their coach/system has produced fairly well with subpar players (minus Hopkins of course).   So it's tough to say.   I hate opting to take someone I feel in my mind is a lesser option at a position just because I don't want to have 2 guys from the same team.     Worst case scenario, you can always either trade Hopkins for an elite tier WR or trade Miller for a similarly tiered RB that you'd feel more comfortable with.  I've done that in the past.     

 

I'm also facing a similar situation entering this year as I have Freeman as a keeper, and could possibly land Julio in the 1st round depending on the draft order.  So I may be faced with a similar scenario as you.     Getting a pulse of your league mates is also a helpful approach, as that'll make any trade convo that much easier to make once you have an idea which owners love which players.     Makes the sell job simpler.    Hope that helps.  

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4 minutes ago, Jigsaw21 said:

the only time I'd ever consider it is if I know it's coming from an elite offense that will have consistent scoring opportunities game to game (Lev Bell + Brown, for example).    

 

Hope that helps.  

 

Bad advice is seldom helpful.

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1 minute ago, Axe Elf said:

 

Bad advice is seldom helpful.

 

"Bad" is a subjective word in the eyes of the beholder.  

To my knowledge, there is no bible with commandments of "This is THE One & Only Way" to construct a team.

If there is, please direct me to the source so I can burn it.  

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No, "bad" applies objectively when the advice given would lead a person to do the wrong thing, as in this case.

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6 minutes ago, Axe Elf said:

No, "bad" applies objectively when the advice given would lead a person to do the wrong thing, as in this case.

 

What is 'wrong', and who anointed you to decide such? 

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"Wrong," in the context of fantasy football, would be the advice that causes a person to have a less successful fantasy football team.

 

Rather than chasing the "chicken or the egg" question of whether it is Axe Elf's anointing that allows him to determine fantasy football success, or fantasy football success that causes Axe Elf to appear anointed, it would probably be best to simply accept that it is Axe Elf's nature to understand fantasy football success and relate this understanding to others.

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I'm not a huge fan of multiple players from the same team, apart from occasional handcuffs, regardless of position. The difficulty is the "off" game or simply facing an on fire defense can act as a multiplier of underperformance. 

 

But not drafting the best player available is another issue. In your hypothetical you wind up with Hopkins and Miller both of whom have huge tradeable upside. As a post above notes there's no good reason to pass over the BPA.

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I've owned Bell and Brown in a PPR 2 keeper for the last few seasons....the experiences have been mixed.    If Pitt is scoring TDs in bunches- they both do well.   If not...both struggle.   I wouldn't knowingly choose two top players from the same team if another option of equal value is available.   

 

Especially with a team like Hou that has many new parts and an unproven qb they overpaid.   If they disappoint and have to rely on D to eek out wins- you're in bad shape times 2.    Plus, what if Hopkins goes down?  Not only do you lose your wr1 but you have defenses packing the line and making Miller less effective.   

 

The whole thing seems like unnecessary risk imo.    

 

 

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1 hour ago, Impreza178 said:

I've owned Bell and Brown in a PPR 2 keeper for the last few seasons....the experiences have been mixed.    If Pitt is scoring TDs in bunches- they both do well.   If not...both struggle.   I wouldn't knowingly choose two top players from the same team if another option of equal value is available.   

 

Especially with a team like Hou that has many new parts and an unproven qb they overpaid.   If they disappoint and have to rely on D to eek out wins- you're in bad shape times 2.    Plus, what if Hopkins goes down?  Not only do you lose your wr1 but you have defenses packing the line and making Miller less effective.   

 

The whole thing seems like unnecessary risk imo.    

 

 

 

I think there is more risk if I drafted a QB and WR together, than there is if I draft a RB and WR, especially in Houston. But I stop to think that Hopkins caught everything last season with four scrub QBs. If Osweiler can be even slightly decent and feed Hopkins the ball, Miller should shine with defenses not stacking the box. There is huge upside if all goes well, but you're right, if Hopkins falls out id be in trouble. 

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19 minutes ago, Nthayer1408 said:

 

I think there is more risk if I drafted a QB and WR together, than there is if I draft a RB and WR, especially in Houston. But I stop to think that Hopkins caught everything last season with four scrub QBs. If Osweiler can be even slightly decent and feed Hopkins the ball, Miller should shine with defenses not stacking the box. There is huge upside if all goes well, but you're right, if Hopkins falls out id be in trouble. 

 

When the Rb and Wr are your top two players-  different than if we're talking Keenan Allen and Gordon.   But the bottom line is If Hou is prolific on offense then you look really smart.   If not...you're dealing with the same issues for both your top players.    How confident are you in Brock and that O-line?   I'm not. 

 

Here's what Pro Football Focus has to say about the Texans line:

 

18. Houston Texans

Pass-blocking rank: 10th

Run-blocking rank:24th

Penalties rank: 21st

Stud: It hurt the Texans that Duane Brown missed action. He wasn’t at his best, but his less-than-best is still better than most.

Dud: Does Xavier Su’a-Filo have what it takes to stick around in this league? He took a step forward in 2015, but he’s still a liability whenever the Texans are pass blocking.

Summary: Not quite the year they would have hoped for from their line. A lack of consistent run blocking outside of Derek Newton was there Achilles heel, though for the most part, they kept their quarterback clean (especially when Brown was on the field).

 

 

 

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Thoughts on Brock and the offensive line: the line itself has proven tight; the jury is still out on Brock, but if we look at last year, half of us could throw passes and Texan WRs would do well (and this year's WR crew will be tougher to cover). At 6'7" Brock will see Hopkins and a screened Miller, though with his mediocre arm (from college and last season) he might not be able to reach Miller. 

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