Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

burninglegs

2016 NFL TV Ratings and the Future

Recommended Posts

17 minutes ago, My Dinner With Andre said:

I'm surprise I missed this. It goes hand in hand with my these that injuries are killing the sport:

....

"According to data from Pro-Football-Reference.com, NFL careers are shrinking at an unprecedented rate. From 2008 to 2014, the average NFL career dropped in length by about two and a half years.

 

The decrease in career lengths is a historical abnormality. From 1991 to about 2008, career lengths were mostly consistent. But since 2008, players have been exiting the league earlier."

 

Pretty sure the NFL CBA in 2011 increased the vet minimum to nearly 1M per year, while the minimum for younger players is much lower.  That could have as much to do with shortening careers as injuries.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Dreams And Dwightmares said:

 

There is a reason that the NFL is America's #1 sport now.  Football can thank fantasy football for it's huge boom and surge in ratings.

 

On Fox and CBS there is pre-game that is completely devoted to the games and the players with nothing to do with Fantasy Football.  Those are also the TV stations that cover the games.  There is no reason to tune to ESPN UNLESS you want fantasy advice and information.  

Do you remember what used to be on ESPN on Sunday's before fantasy football analysis?  Bowling.  It was bowling all day as soon as the 10 AM Sports Center ended.  

 

You are also preaching hate for fantasy football in a fantasy football forum.  What are you trying to do here?

 

Not hate.

 

There's fantasy basketball, fantasy baseball, fantasy hockey, etc. But you're not inundated with it like you are in football.

 

Btw, ESPN2 covers fantasy. I believe ESPN hosts the NFL's traditional pregame programming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
NFL ratings plunge could spell doom for traditional TV
 

Football, America’s biggest prime-time powerhouse, has been thrust into a crisis this fall, with dwindling ratings sparking questions over whether it can remain a gold mine for television in an age when more Americans are abandoning traditional TV.

Network executives have long used the National Football League’s live games as a last line of defense against the rapid growth of “cord-cutting” and on-demand viewing upending the industry.

 

But now, the NFL is seeing its ratings tumble in the same way that the Olympics, awards shows and other live events have, falling more than 10 percent for the first five weeks of the season compared with the first five weeks of last season. A continued slide, executives say, could pose an even bigger danger: If football can’t survive the new age of TV, who can?

 

Football’s traditional TV audience “is never going to be what it was again,” said Brian Hughes, a senior vice president at Magna Global, which tracks audience and advertising trends.

 

The explosion of modern entertainment options, offered on more devices and at any time, has splintered American audiences and sped TV’s decline, Hughes said. “Sports seemed to be immune from it — it was live, the last bastion of broadcast television. But [the world] has caught up to it now.”

 

Network and league executives are scrambling to identify causes. Many have pointed to the highly televised 2016 presidential campaign, which has led cable-news ratings to explode.

 

Election years often thin sports ratings, but the NFL has never seen a drop as dramatic as this year’s, Nielsen data shows. In 2008, for example, ratings over the course of the year declined 2 percent, and in 2000 they declined 10 percent. During the first five weeks of this year, ratings have declined 15 percent compared with the entirety of last year.

 

In an internal NFL memo sent last week and given to The Washington Post, two league executives, Brian ­Rolapp and Howard Katz, wrote that “all networks airing NFL games are down” and that “primetime windows have clearly been affected the most.”

 

They pointed to “a confluence of events,” including the election, to explain the ratings slide. “While our partners, like us, would have liked to see higher ratings,” they added, “they remain confident in the NFL and unconcerned about a long-term issue.”

 

Other weaknesses have plagued America’s most popular TV sport. Some of the league’s top players have retired or have been suspended, including Peyton Manning, Marshawn Lynch and Tom Brady, creating a star-power vacuum that may have driven casual fans away.

 

The games are now available at more times than ever, including afternoons and evenings on Thursday, Sunday and Monday, which analysts said could fragment the market. And some of the season’s early matchups have been uncompetitive or underwhelming.

 

“Sports at the end of the day is a narrative. You can’t create it. It’s organic,” said Neil Macker, an entertainment analyst for Morningstar, an investment research firm. “If you don’t have those compelling story lines, people aren’t going to take the time to watch.”

 

Football last year was still TV’s biggest golden goose, with the ­Super Bowl and other games locking in many of the most-watched hours on air. Its viewership grew in recent years as ratings fell for many of television’s other genres, including scripted dramas, which are often expensive to produce and yield more limited viewerships.

 

Some advertisers said they were content to wait and see whether the season’s ratings improved in coming weeks, believing there were few better options among other sports or TV programming on which they could buy ad time.

 

“In a sea of very low-rated programs, to have the NFL be so dominant even with these depressed ratings, its still something we value,” said Andy Donchin, the chief investment officer for Amplifi US, a division of the ad-buying giant Dentsu Aegis Network.

 

Football’s watched-live tradition has long drawn in advertisers put off by commercial-free networks and streaming services such as HBO and Netflix. The games’ format also gave advertisers confidence that their spots would actually get watched, not just ­fast-forwarded through later via DVRs. But an exodus of cable subscribers, turned off by high cable bills or won over by the growing number of on-demand streaming options, has shunted much of the NFL’s long-established power toward the Web.

 

Time spent watching NFL ­regular-season viewership on ESPN’s streaming service, WatchESPN, grew 73 percent last season, data shows. But that online viewing time has not made up for the lost time from those no longer watching on TV, according to Magna.

 

Though it still dominates the country’s leisure time, traditional TV viewership has rapidly dwindled. Since 2010, the time Americans spend watching TV has dropped 11 percent, Nielsen data shows. For people younger than 24, their TV time has plunged more than 40 percent, with many of those minutes spent instead on social media and their phones.

 

Long-term slides in ratings pose a financial minefield for the big TV networks, which have agreed to pay the league tens of billions of dollars to air NFL games through 2022.

 

The networks do not make enough ad revenue to fully cover those arrangements, according to an industry estimate provided by Magna. But they believe the promotional halo of having NFL games leading viewers into other programming makes the deals worth it. Falling viewership, however, could drive down ad revenue, making the networks’ calculations harder to defend, Hughes said.

 

Streaming services catering to sports viewers on the Web have seen their subscription numbers climb. Sling TV, a Web service that offers ESPN and other live sports starting at $20 a month, has seen “extremely strong growth,” said Ben Weinberger, chief product officer. With every live sports event, Weinberger said, they see more new sign-ups.

 

The Web-motivated trend toward short, punchy online videos, analysts said, may have also motivated some viewers to skip the four-hour football broadcasts until they’ve been distilled down the next day.

 

The NFL has increasingly chopped up its own quick highlight videos of big hits and touchdowns, some of which are published through deals with Web giants such as Twitter, YouTube and Snapchat, in hopes of keeping viewers intrigued.

 

The ratings shift has other sports giants taking notice. Bob Bowman, president of business and media for Major League Baseball, said the league has invested heavily toward grabbing baseball fans wanting to watch games over the Web.

 

MLB.tv, the league’s streaming service, has seen its user base grow about 17 percent a year. League executives, Bowman added, don’t expect viewers will ever return en masse to the traditional way of watching games “in one way on one device — a TV screen that lived on your wall.”

 

“Just look at the numbers: A lot of millennials don’t have cable subscriptions. The only way they can watch is” over the Web, Bowman said. “TV by far is still the dominant player . . . [but] we have to broaden our terms of engagement. It can’t just be, ‘Did you watch the live video of the live game?’ ”

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/nfl-ratings-plunge-could-spell-doom-for-traditional-tv/2016/10/14/a7a23dc2-915f-11e6-9c85-ac42097b8cc0_story.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To the ^^^ point there will be a time in the not too distant future where all of cable TV can be streamed online.  Hell, the cable packages streaming online may even be cheaper than the traditional cable packages BUT we will see cable companies counter in other ways.  You know how Verizon and ATT took away unlimited Data.  Don't be surprised to see that happening in the near future with your cable company led internet.  In may not be for 5,10,15 years from now but as TV subscriptions go down and Data usage goes up with netflix and other services people should be ready to kiss unlimited internet goodbye without paying a traditional cable subscription price. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NFL Ratings Continue To Fall In Primetime, While Baseball And Basketball Are Up

 

http://boston.cbslocal.com/2016/11/01/nfl-ratings-continue-to-fall-in-primetime-while-baseball-and-basketball-are-up/

 

 

Poll: National Anthem Protests Leading Cause For NFL Ratings Drop

 

http://boston.cbslocal.com/2016/10/27/nfl-ratings-national-anthem-protests-poll/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over saturation and lack of star power have made the NFL a bit boring for the casual fan. this is temporary, and can be easily remedied. 

 

Football is still the biggest sport in this country, and will continue to dominate ratings for many years to come. I'd even argue its at the centre of american culture; in some parts of the country, it's all that matters. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/2/2016 at 4:33 PM, predator_05 said:

Over saturation and lack of star power have made the NFL a bit boring for the casual fan. this is temporary, and can be easily remedied. 

 

It was just as over saturated last season though.  

 

I'd be interested to see the ratings change state by state, to see if banning DFS in some states had any effect.

 

if I had to bet, it's a combination of the election, player retirements and DFS being banned in some places.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You guys talk as if it's a one, two-year lull of a lack of stars. Or even that it's cyclical.

 

But it's not. Mark my words: the stars aren't coming back. We're entering into an era of not just RBBC, but O-line by committee, QB by committee, DB by committee, etc. Undrafted rookies starting more and more games.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Iron-cock said:

 

It was just as over saturated last season though.  

 

I'd be interested to see the ratings change state by state, to see if banning DFS in some states had any effect.

 

if I had to bet, it's a combination of the election, player retirements and DFS being banned in some places.

 

 

I don't think DFS will be banned for too much longer. Money, along with a reasoned legal proposition, can easily overcome that hurdle.

 

Regulating DFS and keeping it a 'level' playing field for all participants is the real challenge. Football and gambling go hand in hand, as do football and fantasy. DFS as a concept is undoubtedly here to stay, and more importantly - its still in a nascent phase. It'll be absolutely huge in the future - so much that i'd buy in if it was a publically listed company (provided checks and balances are there, and the model itself is sound). Watch the news for that Fanduel-Draftkings merger.

 

Oversaturation is an issue if the product sucks, which it kind of does at the moment. I don't recall one good prime-time game this year other than Pats-Seahawks. We get too many s---y games on prime-time, and TNF/London games are a drag on the players. Getting rid of TNF would be a nice start, but i can't assume that the administrators see the bigger picture.

 

 

5 hours ago, My Dinner With Andre said:

You guys talk as if it's a one, two-year lull of a lack of stars. Or even that it's cyclical.

 

But it's not. Mark my words: the stars aren't coming back. We're entering into an era of not just RBBC, but O-line by committee, QB by committee, DB by committee, etc. Undrafted rookies starting more and more games.

 

Stars aren't coming back? Stars are made by media coverage. Nobody is a star on his own merits, stardom refers to the context and hype surrounding them.

 

At the moment, we're in a transitional phase where household names or established stars have retired, or are well past their prime. The next generation is young, with few skins on the wall. Odell Beckham, Mike Evans, Sammy Watkins, Derek Carr, David Johnson, Ezekiel Elliott, Dak Prescott, Jameis Winston, Todd Gurley...all kids in terms of their careers, but they have star potential if their careers keep pace. You already have Andrew Luck, Russell Wilson, Cam, Gronkowski, Dez, who'll still be around for another 4-5 years. Obviously the NFL needs most of those names to pan out so people don't change channels once older guys like Brady, Roethlisberger and Brees are gone. What i'm saying is the 'torch' hasn't really been passed yet, but we're getting close.

 

The casual football fan doesn't really know too many of those 2nd or 3rd year names. That can easily change. They will get their hype after some huge performances and the show will keep rolling. But this isn't happening overnight, its still a few years off. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On December 2, 2016 at 4:33 PM, predator_05 said:

Over saturation and lack of star power have made the NFL a bit boring for the casual fan. this is temporary, and can be easily remedied. 

 

Football is still the biggest sport in this country, and will continue to dominate ratings for many years to come. I'd even argue its at the centre of american culture; in some parts of the country, it's all that matters. 

We certainly care less about CTE ball here in Cleveland than we do basketball and baseball.
I do tend to agree with the star power idea. The most exciting athletes are in basketball today. Currently, I'm not looking forward to the NFL playoffs because it's a bunch of teams getting by on offensive lines and defense, also known as lack of star power.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's kind of interesting: The ratings may be "back" (more or less) but I think perhaps the mere news that the ratings were down gave the fans a forum to voice their complaints about the product--even if they were indeed still watching. I remember one fan called into a talk radio show and went down a veritable list of things he didn't like about the NFL--they probably wouldn't even have taken the call a year earlier.

 

I personally a couple of years ago began to think the product was rapidly deteriorating but whenever I would say things like "the NFL is crap" or "football is boring" I would literally get laughed at. Blasphemy.

 

I reckon fans now feel free to voice their displeasure,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The product will be center stage Sunday night. The whole world will have a chance to opine, not just us degenerates who tune in to Thursday night games.

 

 

The game, played at its highest level, would undoubtedly help the NFL salvage a down year. At its worst? It could be a day of reckoning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.