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My Dinner With Andre

CTE could end the game of Football as we know it

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Most dangerous H.S. sport I have ever witnessed...outlawed in certain parts of the country.

Took a look. Have to agree with you. And thinking about it now it makes sense. Falling 20 feet at full speed is probably more dangerous than any hit you might sustain in the NFL. And they do it repetitively.
...ok? Seems like a non-sequitur, fellas.
Sports are dangerous, even ones you might not consider all that unsafe at first. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2085930
I don't understand how that general observation is in any way related to this specific discussion.

That's like saying some people drown in the ocean, so others shouldn't whine about shark attacks when they observe that there are sharks in the water.

Edited by Marlado Faulkando

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And yet Randle El over the course of his 9 year NFL career missed a grand total of 1 regular season game.

Are you pointing this out because there are games he clearly should have missed (concussions come to mind), or that he was an iron man in the NFL during his playing days, yet still ended up debilitated at an early age?

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And yet Randle El over the course of his 9 year NFL career missed a grand total of 1 regular season game.

Are you pointing this out because there are games he clearly should have missed (concussions come to mind), or that he was an iron man in the NFL during his playing days, yet still ended up debilitated at an early age?

I was leaning toward the latter.

The point was that the risks are latent: Randle El during his mid-twenties, ie, his playing career, could have come to the conclusion that he was going to come out of his NFL career in relatively good shape. After all, over a nine-year career he was never injured seriously enough to miss more than a game.

And yet here he is.

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Imho just shorten the span of an nfl career or step away sooner.

Personally I feel that everything has consequences, people "know" what they're getting into. Football is a violent sport, always has been. But so many other things in life can be super hazardous.

Id play football In a heart beat knowing what I know.. Now maybe would I retire a little sooner, sure, possibly

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Football is simulated war where nobody is killed immediately (at least not very often). NFL "owners" basically believe they are sovereign countries and go to battle with another country every Sunday. Its no coincidence football has formations called "shotgun" and "pistol"; quarterbacks has "rocket" arms and throw "bombs."; while the team with the most "weapons" typically always wins. Regardless they make their billions; pay the guys killing themselves $860K (median NFL salary for 2015); then cut them and not pay them a dime if they get hurt.

Americans love violence period. It'd be one thing if the NFL offered players life time medical. Each "owner" could sacrifice a few million each to take care of the guys who make them billions. It doesn't matter what evidence is presented as far as concussions/brain damage are concerned with the NFL. People believe what they want to believe and want to be entertained at the expense of someone else's health. Several scientific studies have shown cancer is cured by hemp oil and antineoplastons. But people still believe its incurable, get radiation/chemo, destroy their insides more than they were before, and die a year or two later (yes, chemo and radiation kill more people than cancer). The cancer treatment lobby is a multi-billion industry. They will protect their assets at all cost; just like the NFL will protect their game despite everyone KNOWING what it is and what it does.

I'm weening myself off of football. Some of the comments in here just show how blood-lusting people are. I'm shutting down one league I'm commish of...and have one more that I'll play through this season because I know a lot of the guys personally and would hate to do that to them. All the NFL has to do is provide life time medical for players and the problem is solved. Politicians get it to ruin lives; NFL player don't and they bring joy to lives. Hell up until last year the NFL had been classified a NON-PROFIT and paid no federal taxes from its inception through 2015; yet they still can't offer life time medical benefits? Convoluted world.

Anyway my rant is over.

Edited by dabeesta17

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1. Brain trauma affects one in three players in the National Football League, according to The New York Times.

2. During the 2013 season there were 228 concussions diagnosed, a NFL Health and Safety Press Conference report showed.

3. Pro football players are eight times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s or dementia than the general population, based on The New York Times report.

4. Receivers and corners suffer more concussions than other players.

5. One-third of all concussions are not listed in the league’s official injury report.

6. In 2013 the league dedicated a lump sum of $675 million to settle claims brought by thousands of former players.

7. Roughly 28 percent of former players are expected to have compensable injuries regarding the 2013 claims, according to NFL’s actuaries.

8. The Department of Veterans Affairs brain bank revealed that 76 out of 79 deceased NFL players had CTE, a degenerative brain disease.

9. There’s an average of 167 total concussions in the regular season, including games and practices, according to the NFL Health and Safety Press Conference.

http://fansided.com/2015/01/17/9-nfl-concussion-statistics-youll-want-know/

September 2000

Dallas owner says Aikman should ignore concussion concerns

Dallas Cowboys’ owner Jerry Jones tells ESPN that he’d push Aikman to ignore concussion concerns if it was a key game “since all data that we have so far don’t point to lasting effects, long-term effects from the head trauma.”

In 1999

The NFL Retirement Board rules that Mike Webster’s head injuries from his years playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Kansas City Chiefs left him “totally and permanently” disabled as “the result of head injuries he suffered as a football player.” The ruling isn’t made public until it’s uncovered by FRONTLINE/ESPN reporters Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/timeline-the-nfls-concussion-crisis/

Read it and learn

Edited by Low and Away

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1. Brain trauma affects one in three players in the National Football League, according to The New York Times.

2. During the 2013 season there were 228 concussions diagnosed, a NFL Health and Safety Press Conference report showed.

3. Pro football players are eight times more likely to develop Alzheimers or dementia than the general population, based on The New York Times report.

4. Receivers and corners suffer more concussions than other players.

5. One-third of all concussions are not listed in the leagues official injury report.

6. In 2013 the league dedicated a lump sum of $675 million to settle claims brought by thousands of former players.

7. Roughly 28 percent of former players are expected to have compensable injuries regarding the 2013 claims, according to NFLs actuaries.

8. The Department of Veterans Affairs brain bank revealed that 76 out of 79 deceased NFL players had CTE, a degenerative brain disease.

9. Theres an average of 167 total concussions in the regular season, including games and practices, according to the NFL Health and Safety Press Conference.

http://fansided.com/2015/01/17/9-nfl-concussion-statistics-youll-want-know/

September 2000

Dallas owner says Aikman should ignore concussion concerns

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones tells ESPN that hed push Aikman to ignore concussion concerns if it was a key game since all data that we have so far dont point to lasting effects, long-term effects from the head trauma.

In 1999

The NFL Retirement Board rules that Mike Websters head injuries from his years playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Kansas City Chiefs left him totally and permanently disabled as the result of head injuries he suffered as a football player. The ruling isnt made public until its uncovered by FRONTLINE/ESPN reporters Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/timeline-the-nfls-concussion-crisis/

Read it and learn

Again...to throw a causal relationship completely on the lap of the NFL is ignorant.

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If you use your skull as a tool (soccer, boxing, football), you will eventually wear out your brain.

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That Concussion movie was garbage and I couldn't even make it through the entire thing. We get it; the NFL was trying to cover up concussion issues. Don't need a dramatized movie version of documented reports to try to further demonize the NFL.

No it wasn't. It was actually a very good film that unlike most, used real names.

And its not just about concussion issues -- CTE is significantly worse.

The movie actually did a good job of depicting the seediness of the NFL oligarchy without taking away from the beauty of the on-field product.

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1. Brain trauma affects one in three players in the National Football League, according to The New York Times.

2. During the 2013 season there were 228 concussions diagnosed, a NFL Health and Safety Press Conference report showed.

3. Pro football players are eight times more likely to develop Alzheimers or dementia than the general population, based on The New York Times report.

4. Receivers and corners suffer more concussions than other players.

5. One-third of all concussions are not listed in the leagues official injury report.

6. In 2013 the league dedicated a lump sum of $675 million to settle claims brought by thousands of former players.

7. Roughly 28 percent of former players are expected to have compensable injuries regarding the 2013 claims, according to NFLs actuaries.

8. The Department of Veterans Affairs brain bank revealed that 76 out of 79 deceased NFL players had CTE, a degenerative brain disease.

9. Theres an average of 167 total concussions in the regular season, including games and practices, according to the NFL Health and Safety Press Conference.

http://fansided.com/2015/01/17/9-nfl-concussion-statistics-youll-want-know/

September 2000

Dallas owner says Aikman should ignore concussion concerns

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones tells ESPN that hed push Aikman to ignore concussion concerns if it was a key game since all data that we have so far dont point to lasting effects, long-term effects from the head trauma.

In 1999

The NFL Retirement Board rules that Mike Websters head injuries from his years playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Kansas City Chiefs left him totally and permanently disabled as the result of head injuries he suffered as a football player. The ruling isnt made public until its uncovered by FRONTLINE/ESPN reporters Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/timeline-the-nfls-concussion-crisis/

Read it and learn

Again...to throw a causal relationship completely on the lap of the NFL is ignorant.

To deny the NFL of culpability is even more ignorant, when there is EVIDENCE that they knew about this causal relationship for years beforehand. You've lived long enough to see the similarities between this and when the tobacco companies were trying to hide the truth between cigarette smoking and cancer in the 1970s.

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1. Brain trauma affects one in three players in the National Football League, according to The New York Times.

2. During the 2013 season there were 228 concussions diagnosed, a NFL Health and Safety Press Conference report showed.

3. Pro football players are eight times more likely to develop Alzheimers or dementia than the general population, based on The New York Times report.

4. Receivers and corners suffer more concussions than other players.

5. One-third of all concussions are not listed in the leagues official injury report.

6. In 2013 the league dedicated a lump sum of $675 million to settle claims brought by thousands of former players.

7. Roughly 28 percent of former players are expected to have compensable injuries regarding the 2013 claims, according to NFLs actuaries.

8. The Department of Veterans Affairs brain bank revealed that 76 out of 79 deceased NFL players had CTE, a degenerative brain disease.

9. Theres an average of 167 total concussions in the regular season, including games and practices, according to the NFL Health and Safety Press Conference.

http://fansided.com/2015/01/17/9-nfl-concussion-statistics-youll-want-know/

September 2000

Dallas owner says Aikman should ignore concussion concerns

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones tells ESPN that hed push Aikman to ignore concussion concerns if it was a key game since all data that we have so far dont point to lasting effects, long-term effects from the head trauma.

In 1999

The NFL Retirement Board rules that Mike Websters head injuries from his years playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Kansas City Chiefs left him totally and permanently disabled as the result of head injuries he suffered as a football player. The ruling isnt made public until its uncovered by FRONTLINE/ESPN reporters Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/timeline-the-nfls-concussion-crisis/

Read it and learn

Again...to throw a causal relationship completely on the lap of the NFL is ignorant.

To deny the NFL of culpability is even more ignorant, when there is EVIDENCE that they knew about this causal relationship for years beforehand. You've lived long enough to see the similarities between this and when the tobacco companies were trying to hide the truth between cigarette smoking and cancer in the 1970s.

Please, that's one hell of a stretch...there used to be ads for Doctor-endorsed cigarette brands in the 50s, nobody has ever called playing football a smart choice when it comes to one's health.

Show me evidence that shows CTE is caused by trauma received AFTER the age of 21, and that the NFL knew this & tried to hide it from its employees, then you'll have something that can justify the scrutiny the NFL is under over this.

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1. Brain trauma affects one in three players in the National Football League, according to The New York Times.

2. During the 2013 season there were 228 concussions diagnosed, a NFL Health and Safety Press Conference report showed.

3. Pro football players are eight times more likely to develop Alzheimers or dementia than the general population, based on The New York Times report.

4. Receivers and corners suffer more concussions than other players.

5. One-third of all concussions are not listed in the leagues official injury report.

6. In 2013 the league dedicated a lump sum of $675 million to settle claims brought by thousands of former players.

7. Roughly 28 percent of former players are expected to have compensable injuries regarding the 2013 claims, according to NFLs actuaries.

8. The Department of Veterans Affairs brain bank revealed that 76 out of 79 deceased NFL players had CTE, a degenerative brain disease.

9. Theres an average of 167 total concussions in the regular season, including games and practices, according to the NFL Health and Safety Press Conference.

http://fansided.com/2015/01/17/9-nfl-concussion-statistics-youll-want-know/

September 2000

Dallas owner says Aikman should ignore concussion concerns

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones tells ESPN that hed push Aikman to ignore concussion concerns if it was a key game since all data that we have so far dont point to lasting effects, long-term effects from the head trauma.

In 1999

The NFL Retirement Board rules that Mike Websters head injuries from his years playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Kansas City Chiefs left him totally and permanently disabled as the result of head injuries he suffered as a football player. The ruling isnt made public until its uncovered by FRONTLINE/ESPN reporters Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/timeline-the-nfls-concussion-crisis/

Read it and learn

Again...to throw a causal relationship completely on the lap of the NFL is ignorant.

To deny the NFL of culpability is even more ignorant, when there is EVIDENCE that they knew about this causal relationship for years beforehand. You've lived long enough to see the similarities between this and when the tobacco companies were trying to hide the truth between cigarette smoking and cancer in the 1970s.

Please, that's one hell of a stretch...there used to be ads for Doctor-endorsed cigarette brands in the 50s, nobody has ever called playing football a smart choice when it comes to one's health.

Show me evidence that shows CTE is caused by trauma received AFTER the age of 21, and that the NFL knew this & tried to hide it from its employees, then you'll have something that can justify the scrutiny the NFL is under over this.

Thats the same defense as the cigarette companies use. Not everyone develops cancer at the same time so there is no link to cigarette smoking and cancer. This is a losing battle Psy.

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1. Brain trauma affects one in three players in the National Football League, according to The New York Times.

2. During the 2013 season there were 228 concussions diagnosed, a NFL Health and Safety Press Conference report showed.

3. Pro football players are eight times more likely to develop Alzheimers or dementia than the general population, based on The New York Times report.

4. Receivers and corners suffer more concussions than other players.

5. One-third of all concussions are not listed in the leagues official injury report.

6. In 2013 the league dedicated a lump sum of $675 million to settle claims brought by thousands of former players.

7. Roughly 28 percent of former players are expected to have compensable injuries regarding the 2013 claims, according to NFLs actuaries.

8. The Department of Veterans Affairs brain bank revealed that 76 out of 79 deceased NFL players had CTE, a degenerative brain disease.

9. Theres an average of 167 total concussions in the regular season, including games and practices, according to the NFL Health and Safety Press Conference.

http://fansided.com/2015/01/17/9-nfl-concussion-statistics-youll-want-know/

September 2000

Dallas owner says Aikman should ignore concussion concerns

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones tells ESPN that hed push Aikman to ignore concussion concerns if it was a key game since all data that we have so far dont point to lasting effects, long-term effects from the head trauma.

In 1999

The NFL Retirement Board rules that Mike Websters head injuries from his years playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Kansas City Chiefs left him totally and permanently disabled as the result of head injuries he suffered as a football player. The ruling isnt made public until its uncovered by FRONTLINE/ESPN reporters Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/timeline-the-nfls-concussion-crisis/

Read it and learn

Again...to throw a causal relationship completely on the lap of the NFL is ignorant.

To deny the NFL of culpability is even more ignorant, when there is EVIDENCE that they knew about this causal relationship for years beforehand. You've lived long enough to see the similarities between this and when the tobacco companies were trying to hide the truth between cigarette smoking and cancer in the 1970s.

Please, that's one hell of a stretch...there used to be ads for Doctor-endorsed cigarette brands in the 50s, nobody has ever called playing football a smart choice when it comes to one's health.

Show me evidence that shows CTE is caused by trauma received AFTER the age of 21, and that the NFL knew this & tried to hide it from its employees, then you'll have something that can justify the scrutiny the NFL is under over this.

Thats the same defense as the cigarette companies use. Not everyone develops cancer at the same time so there is no link to cigarette smoking and cancer. This is a losing battle Psy.

It's not even close to the same argument.

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1. Brain trauma affects one in three players in the National Football League, according to The New York Times.

2. During the 2013 season there were 228 concussions diagnosed, a NFL Health and Safety Press Conference report showed.

3. Pro football players are eight times more likely to develop Alzheimers or dementia than the general population, based on The New York Times report.

4. Receivers and corners suffer more concussions than other players.

5. One-third of all concussions are not listed in the leagues official injury report.

6. In 2013 the league dedicated a lump sum of $675 million to settle claims brought by thousands of former players.

7. Roughly 28 percent of former players are expected to have compensable injuries regarding the 2013 claims, according to NFLs actuaries.

8. The Department of Veterans Affairs brain bank revealed that 76 out of 79 deceased NFL players had CTE, a degenerative brain disease.

9. Theres an average of 167 total concussions in the regular season, including games and practices, according to the NFL Health and Safety Press Conference.

http://fansided.com/2015/01/17/9-nfl-concussion-statistics-youll-want-know/

September 2000

Dallas owner says Aikman should ignore concussion concerns

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones tells ESPN that hed push Aikman to ignore concussion concerns if it was a key game since all data that we have so far dont point to lasting effects, long-term effects from the head trauma.

In 1999

The NFL Retirement Board rules that Mike Websters head injuries from his years playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Kansas City Chiefs left him totally and permanently disabled as the result of head injuries he suffered as a football player. The ruling isnt made public until its uncovered by FRONTLINE/ESPN reporters Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/timeline-the-nfls-concussion-crisis/

Read it and learn

Again...to throw a causal relationship completely on the lap of the NFL is ignorant.

To deny the NFL of culpability is even more ignorant, when there is EVIDENCE that they knew about this causal relationship for years beforehand. You've lived long enough to see the similarities between this and when the tobacco companies were trying to hide the truth between cigarette smoking and cancer in the 1970s.

Please, that's one hell of a stretch...there used to be ads for Doctor-endorsed cigarette brands in the 50s, nobody has ever called playing football a smart choice when it comes to one's health.

Show me evidence that shows CTE is caused by trauma received AFTER the age of 21, and that the NFL knew this & tried to hide it from its employees, then you'll have something that can justify the scrutiny the NFL is under over this.

Thats the same defense as the cigarette companies use. Not everyone develops cancer at the same time so there is no link to cigarette smoking and cancer. This is a losing battle Psy.

It's not even close to the same argument.

How is it not? elaborate?

Edited by bhawks489

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Imho just shorten the span of an nfl career or step away sooner.

Personally I feel that everything has consequences, people "know" what they're getting into. Football is a violent sport, always has been. But so many other things in life can be super hazardous.

Id play football In a heart beat knowing what I know.. Now maybe would I retire a little sooner, sure, possibly

That's kind of a moving target though. Some positions/players could be fine after 10 seasons and some will be shot after 5.

The lifetime medical seems like a good step- A couple mill. is a drop in the bucket for a multi billion dollar industry.

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My guess is that the NFL will someday offer their veterans long-term healthcare, I'm sure they are trying to determine the qualifiers right now. I'll be happy when that day comes.

The NFL has invested millions of $ over the past few decades for research & equipment improvements in an attempt to protect their investment....they are not the bad guy in this battle.

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My guess is that the NFL will someday offer their veterans long-term healthcare, I'm sure they are trying to determine the qualifiers right now. I'll be happy when that day comes.

The NFL has invested millions of $ over the past few decades for research & equipment improvements in an attempt to protect their investment....they are not the bad guy in this battle.

And the cigarette companies poured millions of research into health risks for cigs....I think that source may be biased.

Very similar situation. I do think the NFL is making strides to make the game safer but only because the long term effects of NFL are being put in the spotlight more and more.

Edited by bhawks489

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1. Brain trauma affects one in three players in the National Football League, according to The New York Times.

2. During the 2013 season there were 228 concussions diagnosed, a NFL Health and Safety Press Conference report showed.

3. Pro football players are eight times more likely to develop Alzheimers or dementia than the general population, based on The New York Times report.

4. Receivers and corners suffer more concussions than other players.

5. One-third of all concussions are not listed in the leagues official injury report.

6. In 2013 the league dedicated a lump sum of $675 million to settle claims brought by thousands of former players.

7. Roughly 28 percent of former players are expected to have compensable injuries regarding the 2013 claims, according to NFLs actuaries.

8. The Department of Veterans Affairs brain bank revealed that 76 out of 79 deceased NFL players had CTE, a degenerative brain disease.

9. Theres an average of 167 total concussions in the regular season, including games and practices, according to the NFL Health and Safety Press Conference.

http://fansided.com/2015/01/17/9-nfl-concussion-statistics-youll-want-know/

September 2000

Dallas owner says Aikman should ignore concussion concerns

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones tells ESPN that hed push Aikman to ignore concussion concerns if it was a key game since all data that we have so far dont point to lasting effects, long-term effects from the head trauma.

In 1999

The NFL Retirement Board rules that Mike Websters head injuries from his years playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Kansas City Chiefs left him totally and permanently disabled as the result of head injuries he suffered as a football player. The ruling isnt made public until its uncovered by FRONTLINE/ESPN reporters Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/timeline-the-nfls-concussion-crisis/

Read it and learn

Again...to throw a causal relationship completely on the lap of the NFL is ignorant.

To deny the NFL of culpability is even more ignorant, when there is EVIDENCE that they knew about this causal relationship for years beforehand. You've lived long enough to see the similarities between this and when the tobacco companies were trying to hide the truth between cigarette smoking and cancer in the 1970s.

Please, that's one hell of a stretch...there used to be ads for Doctor-endorsed cigarette brands in the 50s, nobody has ever called playing football a smart choice when it comes to one's health.

Show me evidence that shows CTE is caused by trauma received AFTER the age of 21, and that the NFL knew this & tried to hide it from its employees, then you'll have something that can justify the scrutiny the NFL is under over this.

Thats the same defense as the cigarette companies use. Not everyone develops cancer at the same time so there is no link to cigarette smoking and cancer. This is a losing battle Psy.

It's not even close to the same argument.

To think that you're very naive (unlikely given your posting history), trolling, or on Goodell's payroll.

Show some evidence to the contrary if you're so convinced.

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Teague was not the only tobacco insider conceding a hazard. Harris Parmele, Lorillard's director of research, in 1946 had commented privately on how ‘Certain scientists and medical authorities have claimed for many years that the use of tobacco contributes to cancer development in susceptible people. Just enough evidence has been presented to justify the possibility of such a presumption’.23 The American Tobacco Company in the summer of 1953 took the extraordinary step of sponsoring a series of secret animal tests in the laboratories of the Ecusta Paper Corporation, makers of much of the world’s cigarette paper, with the goal of finding out whether it was the tobacco leaf or the cigarette paper that was causing all this cancer. Their conclusion, distributed only privately, was that tobacco—and not the paper—was the culprit.21

Tobacco industry insiders by the mid 1950s clearly knew their product was dangerous. In December of 1953, when Hill and Knowlton was exploring how to respond to the uproar surrounding the publication of carcinogens in cigarette smoke, one tobacco company research director commented in a confidential interview: ‘Boy! Wouldn't it be wonderful if our company was first to produce a cancer-free cigarette. What we could do to competition!’ Another remarked on how fortunate it was ‘for us’ (ie, for cigarette manufacturers) that smokers were engaging in ‘a habit they can't break’.24 The mid-1950s cancer consensus was clearly (albeit privately) shared by the companies; and the reality of addiction was also starting to be conceded—at least in internal industry documents.

http://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/21/2/87.full

evolution_120207_250.jpg

More than 4,500 former athletes -- some suffering from dementia, depression or Alzheimer's that they blamed on blows to the head -- had sued the league, accusing it of concealing the dangers of concussions and rushing injured players back onto the field while glorifying and profiting from the kind of bone-jarring hits that make for spectacular highlight-reel footage.

The NFL long has denied any wrongdoing and insisted that safety always has been a top priority. But the NFL said Thursday that Commissioner Roger Goodell told pro football's lawyers to "do the right thing for the game and the men who played it."

The settlement most likely means the NFL won't have to disclose internal files about what it knew, and when, about concussion-linked brain problems. Lawyers had been eager to learn, for instance, about the workings of the league's Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Committee, which was led for more than a decade by a rheumatologist.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000235494/article/nfl-explayers-agree-to-765m-settlement-in-concussions-suit

But they settled out of court. Smart of the NFL to settle and for so little when you compare what the year estimated income from pro football and the settlement amount.

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Teague was not the only tobacco insider conceding a hazard. Harris Parmele, Lorillard's director of research, in 1946 had commented privately on how ‘Certain scientists and medical authorities have claimed for many years that the use of tobacco contributes to cancer development in susceptible people. Just enough evidence has been presented to justify the possibility of such a presumption’.23 The American Tobacco Company in the summer of 1953 took the extraordinary step of sponsoring a series of secret animal tests in the laboratories of the Ecusta Paper Corporation, makers of much of the world’s cigarette paper, with the goal of finding out whether it was the tobacco leaf or the cigarette paper that was causing all this cancer. Their conclusion, distributed only privately, was that tobacco—and not the paper—was the culprit.21

Tobacco industry insiders by the mid 1950s clearly knew their product was dangerous. In December of 1953, when Hill and Knowlton was exploring how to respond to the uproar surrounding the publication of carcinogens in cigarette smoke, one tobacco company research director commented in a confidential interview: ‘Boy! Wouldn't it be wonderful if our company was first to produce a cancer-free cigarette. What we could do to competition!’ Another remarked on how fortunate it was ‘for us’ (ie, for cigarette manufacturers) that smokers were engaging in ‘a habit they can't break’.24 The mid-1950s cancer consensus was clearly (albeit privately) shared by the companies; and the reality of addiction was also starting to be conceded—at least in internal industry documents.

http://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/21/2/87.full

evolution_120207_250.jpg

More than 4,500 former athletes -- some suffering from dementia, depression or Alzheimer's that they blamed on blows to the head -- had sued the league, accusing it of concealing the dangers of concussions and rushing injured players back onto the field while glorifying and profiting from the kind of bone-jarring hits that make for spectacular highlight-reel footage.

The NFL long has denied any wrongdoing and insisted that safety always has been a top priority. But the NFL said Thursday that Commissioner Roger Goodell told pro football's lawyers to "do the right thing for the game and the men who played it."

The settlement most likely means the NFL won't have to disclose internal files about what it knew, and when, about concussion-linked brain problems. Lawyers had been eager to learn, for instance, about the workings of the league's Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Committee, which was led for more than a decade by a rheumatologist.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000235494/article/nfl-explayers-agree-to-765m-settlement-in-concussions-suit

But they settled out of court. Smart of the NFL to settle and for so little when you compare what the year estimated income from pro football and the settlement amount.

Good stuff Low.... thanks for posting that.

I do see Psygolf's point. Personal responsibility is sorely lacking in todays society- The lawyers and PC run amok is just disgusting to me. There is no substitute for using ones judgement. I think a healthy distrust of gov't agencies and corporations is necessary.

Money corrupts all

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1. Brain trauma affects one in three players in the National Football League, according to The New York Times.

2. During the 2013 season there were 228 concussions diagnosed, a NFL Health and Safety Press Conference report showed.

3. Pro football players are eight times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s or dementia than the general population, based on The New York Times report.

4. Receivers and corners suffer more concussions than other players.

5. One-third of all concussions are not listed in the league’s official injury report.

6. In 2013 the league dedicated a lump sum of $675 million to settle claims brought by thousands of former players.

7. Roughly 28 percent of former players are expected to have compensable injuries regarding the 2013 claims, according to NFL’s actuaries.

8. The Department of Veterans Affairs brain bank revealed that 76 out of 79 deceased NFL players had CTE, a degenerative brain disease.

9. There’s an average of 167 total concussions in the regular season, including games and practices, according to the NFL Health and Safety Press Conference.

http://fansided.com/2015/01/17/9-nfl-concussion-statistics-youll-want-know/

September 2000

Dallas owner says Aikman should ignore concussion concerns

Dallas Cowboys’ owner Jerry Jones tells ESPN that he’d push Aikman to ignore concussion concerns if it was a key game “since all data that we have so far don’t point to lasting effects, long-term effects from the head trauma.”

In 1999

The NFL Retirement Board rules that Mike Webster’s head injuries from his years playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Kansas City Chiefs left him “totally and permanently” disabled as “the result of head injuries he suffered as a football player.” The ruling isn’t made public until it’s uncovered by FRONTLINE/ESPN reporters Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/timeline-the-nfls-concussion-crisis/

Read it and learn

From the article that you've citied in the New York Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/13/sports/football/actuarial-reports-in-nfl-concussion-deal-are-released.html?_r=0

Greg Aiello, a spokesman for the N.F.L., declined to comment and referred questions to a lawyer representing the league, Brad Karp.

Karp said that the actuaries had based their findings on medical diagnoses reported by the players who sued the league, so the findings were inflated.

The methodology was purposely designed to err on the side of overestimating possible injuries to ensure that adequate funds would be available to pay all awards, under the then-capped settlement structure,” Karp said in an email. “The actuaries’ models do not reflect a prediction of the number of players who will suffer injuries. They are intended to show the court that even if unexpectedly high numbers of players were injured, there still would be sufficient money to pay the claims."

Edited by Iron-cock

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1. Brain trauma affects one in three players in the National Football League, according to The New York Times.

2. During the 2013 season there were 228 concussions diagnosed, a NFL Health and Safety Press Conference report showed.

3. Pro football players are eight times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s or dementia than the general population, based on The New York Times report.

4. Receivers and corners suffer more concussions than other players.

5. One-third of all concussions are not listed in the league’s official injury report.

6. In 2013 the league dedicated a lump sum of $675 million to settle claims brought by thousands of former players.

7. Roughly 28 percent of former players are expected to have compensable injuries regarding the 2013 claims, according to NFL’s actuaries.

8. The Department of Veterans Affairs brain bank revealed that 76 out of 79 deceased NFL players had CTE, a degenerative brain disease.

9. There’s an average of 167 total concussions in the regular season, including games and practices, according to the NFL Health and Safety Press Conference.

http://fansided.com/2015/01/17/9-nfl-concussion-statistics-youll-want-know/

September 2000

Dallas owner says Aikman should ignore concussion concerns

Dallas Cowboys’ owner Jerry Jones tells ESPN that he’d push Aikman to ignore concussion concerns if it was a key game “since all data that we have so far don’t point to lasting effects, long-term effects from the head trauma.”

In 1999

The NFL Retirement Board rules that Mike Webster’s head injuries from his years playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Kansas City Chiefs left him “totally and permanently” disabled as “the result of head injuries he suffered as a football player.” The ruling isn’t made public until it’s uncovered by FRONTLINE/ESPN reporters Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/timeline-the-nfls-concussion-crisis/

Read it and learn

From the article that you've citied in the New York Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/13/sports/football/actuarial-reports-in-nfl-concussion-deal-are-released.html?_r=0

Greg Aiello, a spokesman for the N.F.L., declined to comment and referred questions to a lawyer representing the league, Brad Karp.

Karp said that the actuaries had based their findings on medical diagnoses reported by the players who sued the league, so the findings were inflated.

The methodology was purposely designed to err on the side of overestimating possible injuries to ensure that adequate funds would be available to pay all awards, under the then-capped settlement structure,” Karp said in an email. “The actuaries’ models do not reflect a prediction of the number of players who will suffer injuries. They are intended to show the court that even if unexpectedly high numbers of players were injured, there still would be sufficient money to pay the claims."

The lawyer (Karp) is being slimy as expected. There is no reason why basing the data on only those who sued the league (a VERY small percentage of players) would actually overestimate injuries. If anything it would underestimate injuries, because the vast majority of players wouldn't have known enough about CTE to sue the NFL about it. You can bet that if Karp was being paid by the players rather than the NFL that he would have chosen this side of the argument, which is far more in line with the actual facts.

By the way, the Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Committee that the NFL ran was a complete joke ("and I thought my jokes were bad") -- they used a neurosurgeon (Dr. Michael Apuzzo, who was a consultant for the Giants at the time) to shepherd bogus science on behalf of the NFL into a respected journal (Neurosurgery, which he was editor-in-chief of at the time). Virtually all of the MTBI committee's findings (which purposely tried to silence and counter Omalu's research) were eventually found to be bogus. This is why Apuzzo was fired as editor-in-chief of Neurosurgery, because he made the journal a laughingstock in the medical community since everyone could see that it had become nothing more than a puff piece factory for the NFL. Not a coincidence that after Apuzzo was fired, Omalu's research -- which had been blocked by Neurosurgery for years -- suddenly became published, and CTE started gaining traction in the public consciousness.

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1. Brain trauma affects one in three players in the National Football League, according to The New York Times.

2. During the 2013 season there were 228 concussions diagnosed, a NFL Health and Safety Press Conference report showed.

3. Pro football players are eight times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s or dementia than the general population, based on The New York Times report.

4. Receivers and corners suffer more concussions than other players.

5. One-third of all concussions are not listed in the league’s official injury report.

6. In 2013 the league dedicated a lump sum of $675 million to settle claims brought by thousands of former players.

7. Roughly 28 percent of former players are expected to have compensable injuries regarding the 2013 claims, according to NFL’s actuaries.

8. The Department of Veterans Affairs brain bank revealed that 76 out of 79 deceased NFL players had CTE, a degenerative brain disease.

9. There’s an average of 167 total concussions in the regular season, including games and practices, according to the NFL Health and Safety Press Conference.

http://fansided.com/2015/01/17/9-nfl-concussion-statistics-youll-want-know/

September 2000

Dallas owner says Aikman should ignore concussion concerns

Dallas Cowboys’ owner Jerry Jones tells ESPN that he’d push Aikman to ignore concussion concerns if it was a key game “since all data that we have so far don’t point to lasting effects, long-term effects from the head trauma.”

In 1999

The NFL Retirement Board rules that Mike Webster’s head injuries from his years playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers and Kansas City Chiefs left him “totally and permanently” disabled as “the result of head injuries he suffered as a football player.” The ruling isn’t made public until it’s uncovered by FRONTLINE/ESPN reporters Steve Fainaru and Mark Fainaru-Wada.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/timeline-the-nfls-concussion-crisis/

Read it and learn

From the article that you've citied in the New York Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/13/sports/football/actuarial-reports-in-nfl-concussion-deal-are-released.html?_r=0

Greg Aiello, a spokesman for the N.F.L., declined to comment and referred questions to a lawyer representing the league, Brad Karp.

Karp said that the actuaries had based their findings on medical diagnoses reported by the players who sued the league, so the findings were inflated.

The methodology was purposely designed to err on the side of overestimating possible injuries to ensure that adequate funds would be available to pay all awards, under the then-capped settlement structure,” Karp said in an email. “The actuaries’ models do not reflect a prediction of the number of players who will suffer injuries. They are intended to show the court that even if unexpectedly high numbers of players were injured, there still would be sufficient money to pay the claims."

The lawyer (Karp) is being slimy as expected. There is no reason why basing the data on only those who sued the league (a VERY small percentage of players) would actually overestimate injuries. If anything it would underestimate injuries, because the vast majority of players wouldn't have known enough about CTE to sue the NFL about it. You can bet that if Karp was being paid by the players rather than the NFL that he would have chosen this side of the argument, which is far more in line with the actual facts.

By the way, the Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Committee that the NFL ran was a complete joke ("and I thought my jokes were bad") -- they used a neurosurgeon (Dr. Michael Apuzzo, who was a consultant for the Giants at the time) to shepherd bogus science on behalf of the NFL into a respected journal (Neurosurgery, which he was editor-in-chief of at the time). Virtually all of the MTBI committee's findings (which purposely tried to silence and counter Omalu's research) were eventually found to be bogus. This is why Apuzzo was fired as editor-in-chief of Neurosurgery, because he made the journal a laughingstock in the medical community since everyone could see that it had become nothing more than a puff piece factory for the NFL. Not a coincidence that after Apuzzo was fired, Omalu's research -- which had been blocked by Neurosurgery for years -- suddenly became published, and CTE started gaining traction in the public consciousness.

A lawyer slimy? No way.

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