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Lamont Sanford

Why Not Charged Interceptions?

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23 minutes ago, Corleone said:

 

We'll have to agree to disagree on the bolded part. What if the "drop" happens because the pass was terribly thrown and the WR made an amazing play just to get to the ball? So the WR dropped the ball, but it was a bad pass and the WR made an amazing play to give the team a chance...is the WR still clearly the cause of the INT? Overall, if you go down the route you're suggesting, you'll get all kinds of different rulings and a lot of chaos.

 

I see others in the thread have mentioned screen passes, and I do think that's a fair analogy. There are times when a QB throws the simplest of screen passes, but the pass catcher makes incredible moves (and the offensive line incredible blocks) to give the QB a 70-yard TD pass. When all the QB did was throw a 1-yard dump-off. The QB gets full credit and nobody complains that he unfairly benefitted, even though the pass catcher is "clearly the cause" of the long TD. It has to be the same way with unlucky interceptions too. 

 

To your first point, again I’d reference MLB. If a player makes a diving attempt to catch a ball and comes up short he is not charged with an error. Likewise, a WR should not be charged with a drop (or INT) for making a play on a poorly thrown pass. That should be on the QB. These kind of judgement calls are already being made by whoever determines what is and isn’t a “drop”, so I don’t see the rabbit hole argument.  

 

To your second point, I actually do think that’s an obvious flaw in fantasy football. A QB getting crazy points for a 1 yd dump off is stupid, but that’s a lot trickier to correct than the WR drop/INT thing. That said, coming up with a way to address the “screen pass TD flaw” would be an interesting discussion. I suppose it would have to involve some kind of “air yards” factor, but that does seem quite complicated.

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4 hours ago, Corleone said:

 

We'll have to agree to disagree on the bolded part. What if the "drop" happens because the pass was terribly thrown and the WR made an amazing play just to get to the ball? So the WR dropped the ball, but it was a bad pass and the WR made an amazing play to give the team a chance...is the WR still clearly the cause of the INT? Overall, if you go down the route you're suggesting, you'll get all kinds of different rulings and a lot of chaos.

 

I see others in the thread have mentioned screen passes, and I do think that's a fair analogy. There are times when a QB throws the simplest of screen passes, but the pass catcher makes incredible moves (and the offensive line incredible blocks) to give the QB a 70-yard TD pass. When all the QB did was throw a 1-yard dump-off. The QB gets full credit and nobody complains that he unfairly benefitted, even though the pass catcher is "clearly the cause" of the long TD. It has to be the same way with unlucky interceptions too. 

 

Drops are on passes that should be caught. An exceptional effort or difficult catch is not counted as a drop...

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16 hours ago, Lamont Sanford said:

 

Your uncle might.

 

Haha, just noticing your response. Touché

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4 hours ago, MyDawgggg said:

 

Drops are on passes that should be caught. An exceptional effort or difficult catch is not counted as a drop...

 

Correct.

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