bluefrogguy

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Discussion

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12 minutes ago, fletch44 said:

I don't put a whole lot of blame on anyone outside of China. Sure, it's easy to play Monday morning QB and say we should have done , this, that or whatever but even Fauci wasn't suggesting we start social distancing, wearing masks or lockdowns back in February. Hell, some people said some of the early preventative measures taken were racist/xenophobic. Once this thing was out of the bag, life was going was going to be tragically altered no matter what we did. The only thing that could have prevented this was nipping it in bud.

Mistakes were made early on which led us down a path with more pain, in death's and economically. We're just not going to totally agree on who is to blame for the mistakes. I've decided not to point fingers anymore. 

Imo, all we can do now is to learn from our mistakes and try to be more prepared for the next pandemic. 

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38 minutes ago, IceGoat said:

Agree 100%. I don't know how, in this interconnected globalized world could the spread of such a highly-communicable disease been averted, if not put out at its source. I would find fewer faults with China if they had been more open about it from the outset. 

 

31 minutes ago, lolcopter said:

The federal and state system is working as intended. Comparisons to countries with socialized healthcare and a fraction of our population don't really translate. If you don't want to blame individual governors for their particularly bad situations and would rather run it up the chain, so be it. 

 

Fault is not binary.

Let's try this in a non-pandemic context.  An arsonist sets fire to a duplex in a small town.  Two fire companies take the call, each one assuming responsibility for one unit in the building.  Company A shows up immediately and begins putting the fire out, while Company B wonders if it was really the owner's responsibility to prevent and extinguish the fire.  Eventually, seeing that the fire is engulfing both units, Company B finally arrives, and begins fighting their half of the blaze.  At the end of the day, the first unit is damaged but salvageable, while the second is a total loss.

Is it the arsonist's fault for setting the blaze?  Certainly.  But arson happens, which is why we have fire departments, and they have a responsibility to protect people and property even when the fire was preventable.  And frankly, the analogy works whether you call Company A South Korea and Company B the United States, or whether you call Company A the State of Washington and Company B the State of New York.  Those entities that responded earlier and more forcefully, be they foreign nations or US states, have generally had fewer lives lost and a quicker return to normalcy than those that abdicated their responsibility or eschewed expert opinion.

China did a horrible job containing the virus. Also, the feds didn't take it seriously.  Also, many state governors failed to do their part.  All of these things can be true.

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I've never found the whole "who to blame" conversation to be particularly interesting or productive.  It can't be undone.  It is unlikely any of us will face similar circumstances again in our lifetimes.

That said, when I am in the voting booth in November I will certainly be thinking about individual judgement I expect people to display moving forward, and some of that will be based on whether it appears as though they had a motivation to protect others or their own political career during this crisis when I cast my ballot.

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Pivoting away from the blame discussion, I found this Salt Lake Tribune piece on the risks associated with various venues and activities to be very informative, if a bit disappointing from a "when can we get back to watching live baseball" standpoint.

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6 minutes ago, tonycpsu said:

Pivoting away from the blame discussion, I found this Salt Lake Tribune piece on the risks associated with various venues and activities to be very informative, if a bit disappointing from a "when can we get back to watching live baseball" standpoint.

Although (relatively) good news for offices and schools.

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1 hour ago, tonycpsu said:

Pivoting away from the blame discussion, I found this Salt Lake Tribune piece on the risks associated with various venues and activities to be very informative, if a bit disappointing from a "when can we get back to watching live baseball" standpoint.

 

Or basically anything enjoyable. 

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4 hours ago, JE7HorseGod said:

Although (relatively) good news for offices and schools.

Not really. Did you actually read it all?  The schools weren't operating like normal.  It was also based on some schools in Australia.  I'm not sure how much alike they are to schools in the US.  I know schools in the US compared to some other parts of the world are incomparable.

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53 minutes ago, MrBrown said:

Not really. Did you actually read it all?  The schools weren't operating like normal.  It was also based on some schools in Australia.  I'm not sure how much alike they are to schools in the US.  I know schools in the US compared to some other parts of the world are incomparable.

Better than kids getting sick, regardless of the conditions or location.

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26 minutes ago, JE7HorseGod said:

Better than kids getting sick, regardless of the conditions or location.

Not sure what you're talking about.  Half the kids weren't there.

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30 minutes ago, MrBrown said:

Not sure what you're talking about.  Half the kids weren't there.

There were 18 coronavirus cases split evenly, nine students and nine staff. But out of 863 close contacts with those people — of which 384 were tested — only two secondary cases were discovered: one in a high school, and one in a primary school. That’s a tiny transmission rate.

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