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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Baseball Impact

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15 minutes ago, The Big Bat Theory said:

Team buses from where?  These players are currently at their homes scattered all over the US and foreign countries like the DR, Japan, etc right now.  You sending some bus out to pick up players all over the country one by one? 

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51 minutes ago, WahooManiac said:

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Aaah - this was a good one!

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1 hour ago, The Big Bat Theory said:

Team buses from where?  These players are currently at their homes scattered all over the US and foreign countries like the DR, Japan, etc right now.  You sending some bus out to pick up players all over the country one by one?

 

I was saying corona could mess up baseball from the beginning.  But at the same time, I think extreme/blind pessimism is just as inaccurate as extreme/blind optimism. 

Two things are consistently overlooked here.

1) We're not talking about getting a Chuck E. Cheese up and running. Many of these players make in a game what average people make in a year (and have a limited time to do so).  The resources and incentives to make it happen are probably greater than any other business.  And keep in mind, many businesses are up and running right now and will continue to be, barring a catastrophic scenario.  Why would my nearest Home Depot, which generates maybe  a few hundred bucks per day per worker find a way to make it work, but it is absolutely inconceivable that MLB, which generates tens of thousands per day per worker, could find a way to make it work?  Maybe not exactly perfectly with every single player getting there.  Still, they'll look for reasons to make it work, not look for reasons to give up.  I'll put it this way.  If I offered everyone in this thread $1 million to find a way to be in Arizona by June 1, and whatever funding they needed, I bet almost all of them would do it.  They wouldn't just say, "airports are risky" and quit after 3 seconds of thought.

2) This virus doesn't turn anyone who comes within 200 feet of it into a pod person.  It really sucks. It's not "just the flu." But the other extreme is not true either.  A fit 28 year old man doesn't really need to live in all consuming terror of the virus, even though it is one of many things in the world that COULD harm him.  It doesn't have to be the case that absolutely nobody is ever exposed to it.  It can be dealt with and managed, like many other risks in life.  Plus, exposure is likely at some point anyway. A great many players and personel will already have been exposed in a couple months and hopefully will have the testing to know which. We will know a lot more about the virus and possibly how to treat it.  Hopefully, our capacity for dealing with it will be better.  Our goals, collectively and individually are to manage this problem, not avoid it completely because that can't be done.

 

Of course none of us know how all this will unfold regarding baseball or in general. There is a range of possibilities including catastrophe.  But, while I completely favor the current shut downs and taking this thing seriously, I don't buy the idea that life as we know it must be completely shut down until there is no danger whatsoever.  Any more than I buy the idea that we should forget about civil liberties because terrorism and drug cartels exist. 

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5 minutes ago, GamblorLA said:

 

I was saying corona could mess up baseball from the beginning.  But at the same time, I think extreme/blind pessimism is just as inaccurate as extreme/blind optimism. 

Two things are consistently overlooked here.

1) We're not talking about getting a Chuck E. Cheese up and running. Many of these players make in a game what average people make in a year (and have a limited time to do so).  The resources and incentives to make it happen are probably greater than any other business.  And keep in mind, many businesses are up and running right now and will continue to be, barring a catastrophic scenario.  Why would my nearest Home Depot, which generates maybe  a few hundred bucks per day per worker find a way to make it work, but it is absolutely inconceivable that MLB, which generates tens of thousands per day per worker, could find a way to make it work?  Maybe not exactly perfectly with every single player getting there.  Still, they'll look for reasons to make it work, not look for reasons to give up.  I'll put it this way.  If I offered everyone in this thread $1 million to find a way to be in Arizona by June 1, and whatever funding they needed, I bet almost all of them would do it.  They wouldn't just say, "airports are risky" and quit after 3 seconds of thought.

2) This virus doesn't turn anyone who comes within 200 feet of it into a pod person.  It really sucks. It's not "just the flu." But the other extreme is not true either.  A fit 28 year old man doesn't really need to live in all consuming terror of the virus, even though it is one of many things in the world that COULD harm him.  It doesn't have to be the case that absolutely nobody is ever exposed to it.  It can be dealt with and managed, like many other risks in life.  Plus, exposure is likely at some point anyway. A great many players and personel will already have been exposed in a couple months and hopefully will have the testing to know which. We will know a lot more about the virus and possibly how to treat it.  Hopefully, our capacity for dealing with it will be better.  Our goals, collectively and individually are to manage this problem, not avoid it completely because that can't be done.

 

Of course none of us know how all this will unfold regarding baseball or in general. There is a range of possibilities including catastrophe.  But, while I completely favor the current shut downs and taking this thing seriously, I don't buy the idea that life as we know it must be completely shut down until there is no danger whatsoever.  Any more than I buy the idea that we should forget about civil liberties because terrorism and drug cartels exist. 

Well said.

I think whenever public health officials give the greenlight on groups larger than 10 to congregate, etc. that it's going to be about individuals making choices, probably cognizant that there isn't a vaccine at that time.

There's going to be risk involved.  But we can't make the choice for others, only for ourselves.

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1 hour ago, GamblorLA said:

 

I was saying corona could mess up baseball from the beginning.  But at the same time, I think extreme/blind pessimism is just as inaccurate as extreme/blind optimism. 

Two things are consistently overlooked here.

1) We're not talking about getting a Chuck E. Cheese up and running. Many of these players make in a game what average people make in a year (and have a limited time to do so).  The resources and incentives to make it happen are probably greater than any other business.  And keep in mind, many businesses are up and running right now and will continue to be, barring a catastrophic scenario.  Why would my nearest Home Depot, which generates maybe  a few hundred bucks per day per worker find a way to make it work, but it is absolutely inconceivable that MLB, which generates tens of thousands per day per worker, could find a way to make it work?  Maybe not exactly perfectly with every single player getting there.  Still, they'll look for reasons to make it work, not look for reasons to give up.  I'll put it this way.  If I offered everyone in this thread $1 million to find a way to be in Arizona by June 1, and whatever funding they needed, I bet almost all of them would do it.  They wouldn't just say, "airports are risky" and quit after 3 seconds of thought.

2) This virus doesn't turn anyone who comes within 200 feet of it into a pod person.  It really sucks. It's not "just the flu." But the other extreme is not true either.  A fit 28 year old man doesn't really need to live in all consuming terror of the virus, even though it is one of many things in the world that COULD harm him.  It doesn't have to be the case that absolutely nobody is ever exposed to it.  It can be dealt with and managed, like many other risks in life.  Plus, exposure is likely at some point anyway. A great many players and personel will already have been exposed in a couple months and hopefully will have the testing to know which. We will know a lot more about the virus and possibly how to treat it.  Hopefully, our capacity for dealing with it will be better.  Our goals, collectively and individually are to manage this problem, not avoid it completely because that can't be done.

 

Of course none of us know how all this will unfold regarding baseball or in general. There is a range of possibilities including catastrophe.  But, while I completely favor the current shut downs and taking this thing seriously, I don't buy the idea that life as we know it must be completely shut down until there is no danger whatsoever.  Any more than I buy the idea that we should forget about civil liberties because terrorism and drug cartels exist. 

To your first point, the difference between Home Depot and MLB is that one is essential (i.e. sells or produces things that people need to live manageable lives) and one isn't. Home Depot is essential because it sells things like tools, fixtures and other construction parts that people can't live without. MLB is...not. Further to that, many workers at Home Depot literally need to work or they risk having to go on EI. To think a few million dollars will convince your average MLB player to pack things up, enter a high risk environment and be away from their families for a quarter to half a year is incredibly short sighted. Money is a sweet, sweet motivator, but for the rich other things often take precedent, like family and personal safety.

To your second point, I don't even want to argue it because again, it is extremely short sighted. There are growing statistics of young people dying and struggling with this disease. The more we learn about COVID-19, the higher the risks seem to be. To think MLB players will voluntarily put themselves in this position for a pay cheque doesn't consider the fact that 95% of these guys don't need a pay cheque. And to think that the league itself will voluntarily risk putting their most valuable assets (i.e. the players) in this position while the disease still lingers merits other considerations besides "getting baseball back and making money". 

A lot of the people sharing your views seem not to realize that putting on a MLB baseball game is more than just getting the players on the field. It's not as simple as playing the odds and putting on a spectacle for their fans. This disease is killing people every day and there's so much more at stake for these major sports leagues than lost revenue. 

 

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10 minutes ago, Jyeatbvg said:

To your first point, the difference between Home Depot and MLB is that one is essential (i.e. sells or produces things that people need to live manageable lives) and one isn't. Home Depot is essential because it sells things like tools, fixtures and other construction parts that people can't live without. MLB is...not. Further to that, many workers at Home Depot literally need to work or they risk having to go on EI. To think a few million dollars will convince your average MLB player to pack things up, enter a high risk environment and be away from their families for a quarter to half a year is incredibly short sighted. Money is a sweet, sweet motivator, but for the rich other things often take precedent, like family and personal safety.

To your second point, I don't even want to argue it because again, it is extremely short sighted. There are growing statistics of young people dying and struggling with this disease. The more we learn about COVID-19, the higher the risks seem to be. To think MLB players will voluntarily put themselves in this position for a pay cheque doesn't consider the fact that 95% of these guys don't need a pay cheque. And to think that the league itself will voluntarily risk putting their most valuable assets (i.e. the players) in this position while the disease still lingers merits other considerations besides "getting baseball back and making money". 

A lot of the people sharing your views seem not to realize that putting on a MLB baseball game is more than just getting the players on the field. It's not as simple as playing the odds and putting on a spectacle for their fans. This disease is killing people every day and there's so much more at stake for these major sports leagues than lost revenue.

Well said.  Someone surviving coronavirus may end up with scarred and damaged lungs long term.  And yes, a ball player in good health can die of this as well.  Their odds are far better but it is still "odds" and not a guarantee they can't die.  It is basically playing Russian roulette with their lives as well.  And their families because no way many of these players would isolate from their families for months on end.  Those players have their priorities in the right place.

Also, again, they can become the rats of the plague, the Typhoid Marys, that infect others.  Family members, friends, casual strangers who in turn could get sick or even remain asystematic and pass this on to more and more people some of whom could die. 

They also set a bad example on how to act during a world wide crisis with putting mere entertainment ahead of the greater good.  Selfishness instead of selflessness is not a good thing.  We all want baseball back but I for one had rather skip this year than see MLB and players act kn that selfish way.  Or me acting in that selfish way wanting mere entertainment to take precedent over doing what is right and good fro your fellow man.

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10 minutes ago, The Big Bat Theory said:

Well said.  Someone surviving coronavirus may end up with scarred and damaged lungs long term.  And yes, a ball player in good health can die of this as well.  Their odds are far better but it is still "odds" and not a guarantee they can't die.  It is basically playing Russian roulette with their lives as well.  And their families because no way many of these players would isolate from their families for months on end.  Those players have their priorities in the right place.

Also, again, they can become the rats of the plague, the Typhoid Marys, that infect others.  Family members, friends, casual strangers who in turn could get sick or even remain asystematic and pass this on to more and more people some of whom could die. 

They also set a bad example on how to act during a world wide crisis with putting mere entertainment ahead of the greater good.  Selfishness instead of selflessness is not a good thing.  We all want baseball back but I for one had rather skip this year than see MLB and players act kn that selfish way.  Or me acting in that selfish way wanting mere entertainment to take precedent over doing what is right and good fro your fellow man.

But that choice won't be up to you or me.

It'll be up to first public health officials and legislators, then the owners, players union and the players themselves.

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Posted (edited)
On 4/2/2020 at 10:49 PM, GamblorLA said:

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Sidd Finch - awesome one of the original (to me at least) "urban myths" and a perfect hoax by SI - particularly on April Fools..

French horn enthusiast who walks around barefoot and can occasionally break 120 on his fastball.

Edited by SuperJoint

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21 hours ago, Jyeatbvg said:

To your first point, the difference between Home Depot and MLB is that one is essential (i.e. sells or produces things that people need to live manageable lives) and one isn't. Home Depot is essential because it sells things like tools, fixtures and other construction parts that people can't live without. MLB is...not. Further to that, many workers at Home Depot literally need to work or they risk having to go on EI. To think a few million dollars will convince your average MLB player to pack things up, enter a high risk environment and be away from their families for a quarter to half a year is incredibly short sighted. Money is a sweet, sweet motivator, but for the rich other things often take precedent, like family and personal safety.

To your second point, I don't even want to argue it because again, it is extremely short sighted. There are growing statistics of young people dying and struggling with this disease. The more we learn about COVID-19, the higher the risks seem to be. To think MLB players will voluntarily put themselves in this position for a pay cheque doesn't consider the fact that 95% of these guys don't need a pay cheque. And to think that the league itself will voluntarily risk putting their most valuable assets (i.e. the players) in this position while the disease still lingers merits other considerations besides "getting baseball back and making money". 

A lot of the people sharing your views seem not to realize that putting on a MLB baseball game is more than just getting the players on the field. It's not as simple as playing the odds and putting on a spectacle for their fans. This disease is killing people every day and there's so much more at stake for these major sports leagues than lost revenue. 

 

 

It's certainly true that MLB players are motivated by carrot and home depot workers are motivated by stick.  When most people were blowing this off, I made the same point, that most of these guys are set for life and don't NEED to do anything and wouldn't be pressured into playing. 

On the other hand, I think most of them really want to.  Think about fighters and NFL players.  I'll take my chances with covid over CTE.  EASY choice. These NFL players know they are going to be 85 year old men in daily pain at age 45. Most keep playing long after they are set financially.  Different sport I know.  But they got here because they have a great drive and because being a professional athlete is wonderful. So, they won't be strongarmed into playing, but they will want to play and look for ways to make it work.

I know it's a bit more complicated than just getting some guys on the field, but it's not a space shuttle launch either.  I mean, we're just a bunch of dopes posting on an FBB message board and we've already come up with some good ideas, like using the front rows instead of the dug outs to keep a distance.  Hell, I don't see why you couldn't play baseball in a mask and Chris Sabo goggles.  I guess the Korean players were practicing with masks.  Maybe that would make it nearly risk free.  Maybe not.

I don't have any real insight into how bad the pandemic will be.  I know some healthy young people have died.  Anecdotal evidence tells us these aren't all obese/smokers.  It's also an excellent point by big bat theory that a pro athlete doesn't need long term lung damage .  Time will tell on these issues.  Exactly how risky is it for a healthy young person? Will that malaria thing work?  How many people will have been exposed in 2 months, and will they be basically in the clear?  If you take the right precautions, will an activity like baseball be nearly risk free or Russian roulette? 

But my position is that, overall, baseball is MORE likely than some random business or activity to come back while many act like it's less.  They make so much money with so few people compared to, idk, a landscaping business or an auto shop or anything else. That's not just a matter of financial motivation, it means they have the resources to take elaborate precautions and still make a huge profit.  And 99% of players and owners love what they do and are driven people. And lastly, it's about relative risk.  If the virus is just a minor threat (starts singing punk song) but most people are doing things like going to stores and seeing movies, it would be silly not to make millions of dollars as a famous baseball player.  It will probably be lower risk than going to the store. So if you're doing one, why not the other? 

So if life is anything like normal, I think we see baseball.  If we don't see baseball, I think that means things will be very bad overall.  

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13 minutes ago, GamblorLA said:

 

It's certainly true that MLB players are motivated by carrot and home depot workers are motivated by stick.  When most people were blowing this off, I made the same point, that most of these guys are set for life and don't NEED to do anything and wouldn't be pressured into playing. 

On the other hand, I think most of them really want to.  Think about fighters and NFL players.  I'll take my chances with covid over CTE.  EASY choice. These NFL players know they are going to be 85 year old men in daily pain at age 45. Most keep playing long after they are set financially.  Different sport I know.  But they got here because they have a great drive and because being a professional athlete is wonderful. So, they won't be strongarmed into playing, but they will want to play and look for ways to make it work.

I know it's a bit more complicated than just getting some guys on the field, but it's not a space shuttle launch either.  I mean, we're just a bunch of dopes posting on an FBB message board and we've already come up with some good ideas, like using the front rows instead of the dug outs to keep a distance.  Hell, I don't see why you couldn't play baseball in a mask and Chris Sabo goggles.  I guess the Korean players were practicing with masks.  Maybe that would make it nearly risk free.  Maybe not.

I don't have any real insight into how bad the pandemic will be.  I know some healthy young people have died.  Anecdotal evidence tells us these aren't all obese/smokers.  It's also an excellent point by big bat theory that a pro athlete doesn't need long term lung damage .  Time will tell on these issues.  Exactly how risky is it for a healthy young person? Will that malaria thing work?  How many people will have been exposed in 2 months, and will they be basically in the clear?  If you take the right precautions, will an activity like baseball be nearly risk free or Russian roulette? 

But my position is that, overall, baseball is MORE likely than some random business or activity to come back while many act like it's less.  They make so much money with so few people compared to, idk, a landscaping business or an auto shop or anything else. That's not just a matter of financial motivation, it means they have the resources to take elaborate precautions and still make a huge profit.  And 99% of players and owners love what they do and are driven people. And lastly, it's about relative risk.  If the virus is just a minor threat (starts singing punk song) but most people are doing things like going to stores and seeing movies, it would be silly not to make millions of dollars as a famous baseball player.  It will probably be lower risk than going to the store. So if you're doing one, why not the other? 

So if life is anything like normal, I think we see baseball.  If we don't see baseball, I think that means things will be very bad overall.  

Agreed, well said. I am with you on this, 100%.

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46 minutes ago, GamblorLA said:

 

It's certainly true that MLB players are motivated by carrot and home depot workers are motivated by stick.  When most people were blowing this off, I made the same point, that most of these guys are set for life and don't NEED to do anything and wouldn't be pressured into playing. 

On the other hand, I think most of them really want to.  Think about fighters and NFL players.  I'll take my chances with covid over CTE.  EASY choice. These NFL players know they are going to be 85 year old men in daily pain at age 45. Most keep playing long after they are set financially.  Different sport I know.  But they got here because they have a great drive and because being a professional athlete is wonderful. So, they won't be strongarmed into playing, but they will want to play and look for ways to make it work.

I know it's a bit more complicated than just getting some guys on the field, but it's not a space shuttle launch either.  I mean, we're just a bunch of dopes posting on an FBB message board and we've already come up with some good ideas, like using the front rows instead of the dug outs to keep a distance.  Hell, I don't see why you couldn't play baseball in a mask and Chris Sabo goggles.  I guess the Korean players were practicing with masks.  Maybe that would make it nearly risk free.  Maybe not.

I don't have any real insight into how bad the pandemic will be.  I know some healthy young people have died.  Anecdotal evidence tells us these aren't all obese/smokers.  It's also an excellent point by big bat theory that a pro athlete doesn't need long term lung damage .  Time will tell on these issues.  Exactly how risky is it for a healthy young person? Will that malaria thing work?  How many people will have been exposed in 2 months, and will they be basically in the clear?  If you take the right precautions, will an activity like baseball be nearly risk free or Russian roulette? 

But my position is that, overall, baseball is MORE likely than some random business or activity to come back while many act like it's less.  They make so much money with so few people compared to, idk, a landscaping business or an auto shop or anything else. That's not just a matter of financial motivation, it means they have the resources to take elaborate precautions and still make a huge profit.  And 99% of players and owners love what they do and are driven people. And lastly, it's about relative risk.  If the virus is just a minor threat (starts singing punk song) but most people are doing things like going to stores and seeing movies, it would be silly not to make millions of dollars as a famous baseball player.  It will probably be lower risk than going to the store. So if you're doing one, why not the other? 

So if life is anything like normal, I think we see baseball.  If we don't see baseball, I think that means things will be very bad overall.  

Further, when someone says "it's a source of entertainment" they're only looking at it from their prospective.

For these guys, it's their livelihood.  And for a lot of guys 4% ain't gonna cut it in terms of their standard of living.

Now you may say, "small price to pay for being alive."  And you may be right.  But that's not your call, it's their's.

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On 3/29/2020 at 4:26 PM, countseth said:

2) ...So teams go to spring training facilities for all games! All the infrastructure is in place: ballpark, team accommodations, TV, etc. 

3) This means you do 16 teams in FL and 14 teams in AZ

I've even read some recent tweets from sources within MLB that this is something they're actually discussing, but there is a huge reason I can't see the "quarantine at the spring training complexes" thing ever working:

What in the world are you going to do with all the minor leaguers? I've posted this on another site already, but MLB doesn't run without minor leaguers. What happens when a major leaguer gets injured, or suspended, or goes on leave? Where are the replacements going to come from?

You can't expect any players to be ready jump onto an MLB team if they’re just sitting at home without any live games to keep them in shape and sharp. So are are all the MiLB leagues also going to be quarantined as well? Where at? How will they all be housed? The logistics are a nightmare. And that doesn't even take into account any legal hurdles, or ramifications in the event any players, umps, or team employees end up contracting the virus.

I will be absolutely shocked if this turns out to be the solution. No baseball is infinitely more likely than AZ quarantined baseball imo.

 

 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, cs3 said:

I've even read some recent tweets from sources within MLB that this is something they're actually discussing, but there is a huge reason I can't see the "quarantine at the spring training complexes" thing ever working:

What in the world are you going to do with all the minor leaguers? I've posted this on another site already, but MLB doesn't run without minor leaguers. What happens when a major leaguer gets injured, or suspended, or goes on leave? Where are the replacements going to come from?

You can't expect any players to be ready jump onto an MLB team if they’re just sitting at home without any live games to keep them in shape and sharp. So are are all the MiLB leagues also going to be quarantined as well? Where at? How will they all be housed? The logistics are a nightmare. And that doesn't even take into account any legal hurdles, or ramifications in the event any players, umps, or team employees end up contracting the virus.

I will be absolutely shocked if this turns out to be the solution. No baseball is infinitely more likely than AZ quarantined baseball imo.

 

 

 

 

Ill be honest and admit to the fact this isnt even something i had considered, even though its something that is so clear and in plain sight. Very good point... i hadnt even considered the possibility of what the minor leaguers are gonna be doing and what happens in the case a replacement is needed? Man..

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That's an issue.  But I think it's also an example of excessively negative thinking. I mean, there was an NHL game this year where they had the zamboni driver finish the game.  A former minor leaguer in his 40s.  He got the win too!

Very smart, driven people with billions at stake aren't going to be like, "crap, we need minor leaguers" and just give up.  There are any number of ways they could have some live bodies available.  Most obvious is expand rosters.  Could have an NFL style practice squad of 10 guys who live in AZ and stay in shape. etc. 

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11 minutes ago, GamblorLA said:

That's an issue.  But I think it's also an example of excessively negative thinking. I mean, there was an NHL game this year where they had the zamboni driver finish the game.  A former minor leaguer in his 40s.  He got the win too!

Very smart, driven people with billions at stake aren't going to be like, "crap, we need minor leaguers" and just give up.  There are any number of ways they could have some live bodies available.  Most obvious is expand rosters.  Could have an NFL style practice squad of 10 guys who live in AZ and stay in shape. etc. 

What if a percentage of players don't want to play due to unsafe working conditions, then what?

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28 minutes ago, GamblorLA said:

That's an issue.  But I think it's also an example of excessively negative thinking. I mean, there was an NHL game this year where they had the zamboni driver finish the game.  A former minor leaguer in his 40s.  He got the win too!

Very smart, driven people with billions at stake aren't going to be like, "crap, we need minor leaguers" and just give up.  There are any number of ways they could have some live bodies available.  Most obvious is expand rosters.  Could have an NFL style practice squad of 10 guys who live in AZ and stay in shape. etc. 

Ok let's say somehow they don't need minor leaguers.

 

Have you ever been to Arizona in the middle of summer? Did you go outside? Spring training parks are not air conditioned

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IDK, what if there's a nuclear exchange between India and Pakistan? What if another virus comes?  What if there's a terrorist attack? Will there be tax issues? You can poke holes in stuff and worry about what ifs all day. 

But it might be pretty darn safe to play baseball with a mask on and social distancing.  That's a what if too.  Might not be, but it might be. Maybe 75% of people will have already been exposed.  Maybe not.  

If it's really hot, maybe use swamp coolers and play at morning and night.  Here in Vegas, the college football team practices when it's well over 100.  Probably one reason they can't recruit, lol. Oh yeah, we also have a AAA team here that plays in the summer with no AC on the field, at least at the old stadium.  College teams also play baseball.  Could be an issue, but there are ways to deal with it. I just don't understand acting like we're talking about colonizing mars here. It's just baseball.  

If a bunch of players don't want to play, there won't be a season.  If this is really terrible, that's probably what will happen.  If a couple months from now, you can like, go out wearing a mask and just not sit next to anyone, then I don't know why you'd want to do that but not be on TV playing a game you love making millions.  

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31 minutes ago, GamblorLA said:

It's just baseball

Exactly.

 

That's why getting games on isn't a priority.

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Playing with a mask isn't going to work, especially in 100+ temperatures. The South Korean players tried it and I think most took them off because it's too hard to breathe while trying to exert yourself.

I agree that logistically there is a lot of stuff that would need to go right for this to work and it seems extremely difficult but it can be done, especially if we ride out April and a portion of May with the current restrictions in place. I think people are still viewing things as they are on April 6th and saying "impossible!" when, by June or July, it's likely that the current restrictions will be relaxed in many places, especially outdoors, and people will be begging to get out and get back to work, including ball players (both major league and minor league).

If MLB plays in Arizona then you could conceivably do the same in Florida for the AAA teams. AA and A and below will just have to work out independently as teams and perhaps pair up with two or 3 other teams in a warm weather location and play some exhibitions just to keep in shape. Again, this all sounds untenable right now but I'm optimistic that things will be much different in 2-3 months where the idea of 50 people gathering outdoors to play baseball will not seem as crazy as it does at this moment. 

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Posted (edited)

IF (again, IF IF IF)

 

Baseball were played without fans, couldn't the concern that you couldn't social distance teams within themselves (at least in games) be addressed by spacing everyone out in the stands? 

 

So instead of the teams huddling up in the dugout together, everyone takes a seat in the stands and everyone sits 8 seats away from each other. Teams sit on opposing sides of home plate.

 

Sounds ridiculous I know, but that would almost have to be the case if Baseball were played in the era of COVID-19, right? Does that basically make trying this not even worth it?

Edited by UberRebel

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11 minutes ago, UberRebel said:

IF (again, IF IF IF)

 

Baseball were played without fans, couldn't the concern that you couldn't social distance teams within themselves (at least in games) be addressed by spacing everyone out in the stands? 

 

So instead of the teams huddling up in the dugout together, everyone takes a seat in the stands and everyone sits 8 seats away from each other. Teams sit on opposing sides of home plate.

 

Sounds ridiculous I know, but that would almost have to be the case if Baseball were played in the era of COVID-19, right? Does that basically make trying this not even worth it?

Honestly, i dont understand why people are worried about the teams spacing themselves out during the games. Afterall, if this is going to work, they are all going to be confined into a specific area.. only be allowed to travel from hotel to stadium and back.. constant testing.. no contact with anyone outside of professional baseball who are all going to be following the same guidelines.

In other words, there will be no need for the spacing out of the players during the game when living under these conditions.. theres no reason any one within these organizations should be testing positive so the need to distance doesnt really make sense to me.

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The whole MLB in Arizona (to start anyways) really seems to be picking up some steam.. ofcourse, there is still a **** ton of work to do and many many many hurdles to clear, but, they are certainly looking at getting this up and running in May according to Passan and other sources.

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