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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Baseball Impact

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https://www.cbssports.com/mlb/news/mlb-plan-for-2020-season-to-include-approximately-80-games-and-expanded-postseason-report-says/?fbclid=IwAR1RSxAlZOn2Xom_i_2r0dSXNwvr-Xsofo5Lk2hPp2Juq-BMDI8SGObpEAY
 

MLB plan for 2020 season to include approximately 80 games and expanded postseason, report says

Details of MLB's restart plan proposal are beginning to emerge. Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reported several general parameters on Saturday. Here are the nuts and bolts:

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https://theathletic.com/1804433/2020/05/09/rosenthal-latest-details-on-baseballs-plan-to-return?source=user-shared-article

Nothing is official. Major League Baseball will discuss its plans for the 2020 season in a conference call with owners on Monday. If the owners give their approval, the league will present its proposal to the players’ union on Tuesday.

 

As previously reported, even a formal plan would be subject to change; the details are pending ownership and union approval, and the unpredictability of the COVID-19 pandemic might force the league to adjust locales and schedules before the season begins and after it is in progress.

Any plan also would require sign-off from medical experts and confidence that testing for the virus would be sufficiently available. But here is a rough outline of some of what the league would like to do, according to four people with knowledge of the league’s intentions:

• A regular season beginning in early July and consisting of approximately 80 games. The number might not be exactly 80 — 78 and 82 are also possibilities.

The schedule would be regionalized: Teams would face opponents only from their own division and the same geographic division in the opposite league. An NL East club, for example, would face teams only from the NL East and AL East.

A 78-game schedule might look like this: Four three-game series against each division opponent and two three-game series against each non-division opponent.

• Teams would open in as many home parks as possible, with even New York — the major-league city hardest hit by the coronavirus — potentially in play by early July.

Toronto also might open by then, though nonessential travel between the U.S. and Canada is restricted through at least May 21 and all travelers to Canada are subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine.

Teams unable to open in their cities temporarily would relocate, either to their spring training sites or major-league parks in other parts of the country. The same would apply to spring training 2.0 if the league decides to use mostly home parks as opposed to returning to Florida and Arizona.

Not all clubs agree they should train in their home parks, believing spring locales offer a less densely populated, more controlled environment.

• Expanded playoffs similar to the idea first reported by the New York Post in February, with an increase from five to seven teams in each league.

Under this plan, the team with the best record in each league would receive a bye in the wild-card round and advance to the Division Series. The two other division winners and wild card with the best record would face the bottom three wild cards in a best-of-three wild-card round.

• Because games, at least initially, will be played without fans, the players would be asked to accept a further reduction in pay, most likely by agreeing to a set percentage of revenues for this season only.

The idea behind such a plan, from the league’s perspective, would be to protect the players and owners against the economic uncertainty created by the virus.

The players agreed in March to prorate their salaries in a shortened season. Those salaries cover the regular season only, while postseason shares are based upon gate receipts. If the players agreed to a set percentage of revenue, they also would share any additional national TV money generated during the postseason.

Without the players making such a concession, league officials say they will spend more on player salaries than they would earn in revenue for every incremental regular-season game played without fans. The union believes the opposite to be true and that postseason TV and other revenue will further enhance the league’s financial position.

The salary issue remains a source of friction. If the owners say it is not economically feasible to play games without fans, the union almost certainly would ask to see financial proof. The teams do not provide the players with full access to their books.

A number of other considerations, financial and otherwise, will enter the discussions between players and owners. An expanded roster of as many as 45 to 50 players is expected. The parties also would need to determine medical protocols — for instance, how they would react if a player becomes infected with the virus.

The final details are to be determined. But a preferred blueprint is in place.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, JE7HorseGod said:

https://theathletic.com/1804433/2020/05/09/rosenthal-latest-details-on-baseballs-plan-to-return?source=user-shared-article

Nothing is official. Major League Baseball will discuss its plans for the 2020 season in a conference call with owners on Monday. If the owners give their approval, the league will present its proposal to the players’ union on Tuesday.

 

As previously reported, even a formal plan would be subject to change; the details are pending ownership and union approval, and the unpredictability of the COVID-19 pandemic might force the league to adjust locales and schedules before the season begins and after it is in progress.

Any plan also would require sign-off from medical experts and confidence that testing for the virus would be sufficiently available. But here is a rough outline of some of what the league would like to do, according to four people with knowledge of the league’s intentions:

• A regular season beginning in early July and consisting of approximately 80 games. The number might not be exactly 80 — 78 and 82 are also possibilities.

The schedule would be regionalized: Teams would face opponents only from their own division and the same geographic division in the opposite league. An NL East club, for example, would face teams only from the NL East and AL East.

A 78-game schedule might look like this: Four three-game series against each division opponent and two three-game series against each non-division opponent.

• Teams would open in as many home parks as possible, with even New York — the major-league city hardest hit by the coronavirus — potentially in play by early July.

Toronto also might open by then, though nonessential travel between the U.S. and Canada is restricted through at least May 21 and all travelers to Canada are subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine.

Teams unable to open in their cities temporarily would relocate, either to their spring training sites or major-league parks in other parts of the country. The same would apply to spring training 2.0 if the league decides to use mostly home parks as opposed to returning to Florida and Arizona.

Not all clubs agree they should train in their home parks, believing spring locales offer a less densely populated, more controlled environment.

• Expanded playoffs similar to the idea first reported by the New York Post in February, with an increase from five to seven teams in each league.

Under this plan, the team with the best record in each league would receive a bye in the wild-card round and advance to the Division Series. The two other division winners and wild card with the best record would face the bottom three wild cards in a best-of-three wild-card round.

• Because games, at least initially, will be played without fans, the players would be asked to accept a further reduction in pay, most likely by agreeing to a set percentage of revenues for this season only.

The idea behind such a plan, from the league’s perspective, would be to protect the players and owners against the economic uncertainty created by the virus.

The players agreed in March to prorate their salaries in a shortened season. Those salaries cover the regular season only, while postseason shares are based upon gate receipts. If the players agreed to a set percentage of revenue, they also would share any additional national TV money generated during the postseason.

Without the players making such a concession, league officials say they will spend more on player salaries than they would earn in revenue for every incremental regular-season game played without fans. The union believes the opposite to be true and that postseason TV and other revenue will further enhance the league’s financial position.

The salary issue remains a source of friction. If the owners say it is not economically feasible to play games without fans, the union almost certainly would ask to see financial proof. The teams do not provide the players with full access to their books.

A number of other considerations, financial and otherwise, will enter the discussions between players and owners. An expanded roster of as many as 45 to 50 players is expected. The parties also would need to determine medical protocols — for instance, how they would react if a player becomes infected with the virus.

The final details are to be determined. But a preferred blueprint is in place.

What an awful plan. I'd rather just cancel the season

Edited by Triple Short Of a Cycle

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1 hour ago, Triple Short Of a Cycle said:

What an awful plan. I'd rather just cancel the season

Just curious what you don't like about it? At this point for me, it's baseball. It's going to be weird, but it's something to watch and will entertain the country if they can make it work. I also think them trying to have a season helps the NFL. Any issues they run into will likely help the NFL see what will need to be done to make it work, so it's important from that standpoint also. As much as it would suck having no baseball, no football would be worse, for me at least. 

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3 hours ago, Triple Short Of a Cycle said:

What an awful plan. I'd rather just cancel the season

I suspect you might be in the minority on that one. Any form of baseball will be a welcome distraction for me. I recognize that there’s no way for a normal season to happen so to think of sitting back on the 4th of July and watching a full slate of games all day sounds pretty damn good to me right now.

 

....And they'll watch the game, and it'll be as if they'd dipped themselves in magic waters. The memories will be so thick, they'll have to brush them away from their faces

The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball.

America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It's been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt, and erased again. But baseball has marked the time.

This field, this game -- it's a part of our past, Ray. It reminds us of all that once was good, and it could be again.

 

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It isnt what we are used to.. but... baseball is baseball... and i, like many others... would love to have the game back ASAP. Bring it on.

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10 hours ago, Triple Short Of a Cycle said:

What an awful plan. I'd rather just cancel the season

The good news is that no one will force you to watch it.

The rest of us can enjoy it in the meantime.

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https://sports.yahoo.com/cardinals-andrew-miller-players-want-guaranteed-safety-before-returning-012449651.html
 

 Cardinals' Andrew Miller: MLB players want 'guaranteed safety' before returning

 

I don't think anything can be done until (safety) can be guaranteed and we feel comfortable with it," Miller told ESPN. “We want to put a good product on the field, but that's totally secondary to the health of the players. We are generally younger and healthier, but that doesn't mean our staff is, that doesn't mean the umpires are going to be in the clear.

"It's not hard to get one degree of separation away from players who have kids who may have conditions, or other family members that live with them. I'm confident before anything happens, we'll sort through all those issues."

The Athletic's Ken Rosenthal reports the owners will hold a conference call Monday aimed at solidifying a proposal to be presented to the MLBPA on Tuesday.

 

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9 hours ago, KCTD25 said:

Just curious what you don't like about it? At this point for me, it's baseball. It's going to be weird, but it's something to watch and will entertain the country if they can make it work. I also think them trying to have a season helps the NFL. Any issues they run into will likely help the NFL see what will need to be done to make it work, so it's important from that standpoint also. As much as it would suck having no baseball, no football would be worse, for me at least. 

Couldn’t agree more. Please, give me a full season of NFL 🙏 this upcoming (? if we have one) baseball season is one big asterisk. My enthusiasm for fantasy baseball has been in a circling pattern in the toilet. It stinks. 

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14 hours ago, Triple Short Of a Cycle said:

What an awful plan. I'd rather just cancel the season

I don't like the way a lot of what we had before (restaurants, gyms, etc) will look like when first start living again. BUT it's a first step towards getting back to normal. I'll take it and try to appreciate more than I did before. If it's not for you, I understand. 

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14 hours ago, KCTD25 said:

Just curious what you don't like about it? At this point for me, it's baseball. It's going to be weird, but it's something to watch and will entertain the country if they can make it work. I also think them trying to have a season helps the NFL. Any issues they run into will likely help the NFL see what will need to be done to make it work, so it's important from that standpoint also. As much as it would suck having no baseball, no football would be worse, for me at least. 

Adding playoff teams for starters. Second teams in the AL West get a huge benefit by getting to play a weak NL West outside of the Dodgers gaining a big advantage to make the playoffs then a team like the Rays having to play the Mets,Nats and Braves. Finally instead of playing 100 games which I was ok with we are down to 80

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20 minutes ago, Triple Short Of a Cycle said:

It is going to look horrible if players are public fighting over millions of dollars while millions and millions of people are out of work

I don’t see why. They already have. It was in their original agreement. 

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31 minutes ago, Triple Short Of a Cycle said:

It is going to look horrible if players are public fighting over millions of dollars while millions and millions of people are out of work

They already have an agreement in place.

At this point it's the owners going back and asking for millions of dollars more than what they already agreed to.

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All the players agreed to was not to be paid for games not played period. They agreed to lose 1 game of pay for every under 162 played. This is why the players are pushing for doubleheaders 30 man rosters to play as many games they can. The problem is in empty stadiums these players are bringing the teams zero revenue cept for TV revenue. ticket sale refunds the teams are supposed to absorb that. Wanna know why the marlins make out like bandits? Their highest paid player Wei yen Chen gets 23 mill this year and he ain't even on team. yet an eighty game season costs him over 12 mill in pay and saves the marlins 12 mill. The playoffs is a different animal. Those teams get paid a set amount from MLB. Orioles make out good since Chris Davis gets half of the stupid contract they gave him. I do think the players will give more pay back for a universal DH the 30 man roster and other perks otherwise I don't think we have any season.

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32 minutes ago, hailfire4 said:

All the players agreed to was not to be paid for games not played period. They agreed to lose 1 game of pay for every under 162 played. This is why the players are pushing for doubleheaders 30 man rosters to play as many games they can. The problem is in empty stadiums these players are bringing the teams zero revenue cept for TV revenue. ticket sale refunds the teams are supposed to absorb that. Wanna know why the marlins make out like bandits? Their highest paid player Wei yen Chen gets 23 mill this year and he ain't even on team. yet an eighty game season costs him over 12 mill in pay and saves the marlins 12 mill. The playoffs is a different animal. Those teams get paid a set amount from MLB. Orioles make out good since Chris Davis gets half of the stupid contract they gave him. I do think the players will give more pay back for a universal DH the 30 man roster and other perks otherwise I don't think we have any season.

I love how this is somehow the player's problem now that the owners didn't want to work out this particular scenario when empty stadiums were being discussed before they shut spring training down.

The players are the ones taking all the risk in this scenario, as I see it the owners have very little leverage to go back and ask for another deal because they could lose a portion of the revenue.  For years they've wanted to play their cards close to the vest about how they make their money because it benefits them, there's virtually no transparency with regards to gate vs tv vs all other revenue streams.

A new expanded playoff format plus being the only game in town when people are dying for something to watch should more than offset their gate losses when they get a new playoff deal.  I have no sympathy for these guys wanting to go back and get a bigger share of the pie when the deal is already in place.

 

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On 5/9/2020 at 6:50 PM, JE7HorseGod said:

https://theathletic.com/1804433/2020/05/09/rosenthal-latest-details-on-baseballs-plan-to-return?source=user-shared-article

Nothing is official. Major League Baseball will discuss its plans for the 2020 season in a conference call with owners on Monday. If the owners give their approval, the league will present its proposal to the players’ union on Tuesday.

 

As previously reported, even a formal plan would be subject to change; the details are pending ownership and union approval, and the unpredictability of the COVID-19 pandemic might force the league to adjust locales and schedules before the season begins and after it is in progress.

Any plan also would require sign-off from medical experts and confidence that testing for the virus would be sufficiently available. But here is a rough outline of some of what the league would like to do, according to four people with knowledge of the league’s intentions:

• A regular season beginning in early July and consisting of approximately 80 games. The number might not be exactly 80 — 78 and 82 are also possibilities.

The schedule would be regionalized: Teams would face opponents only from their own division and the same geographic division in the opposite league. An NL East club, for example, would face teams only from the NL East and AL East.

A 78-game schedule might look like this: Four three-game series against each division opponent and two three-game series against each non-division opponent.

• Teams would open in as many home parks as possible, with even New York — the major-league city hardest hit by the coronavirus — potentially in play by early July.

Toronto also might open by then, though nonessential travel between the U.S. and Canada is restricted through at least May 21 and all travelers to Canada are subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine.

Teams unable to open in their cities temporarily would relocate, either to their spring training sites or major-league parks in other parts of the country. The same would apply to spring training 2.0 if the league decides to use mostly home parks as opposed to returning to Florida and Arizona.

Not all clubs agree they should train in their home parks, believing spring locales offer a less densely populated, more controlled environment.

• Expanded playoffs similar to the idea first reported by the New York Post in February, with an increase from five to seven teams in each league.

Under this plan, the team with the best record in each league would receive a bye in the wild-card round and advance to the Division Series. The two other division winners and wild card with the best record would face the bottom three wild cards in a best-of-three wild-card round.

• Because games, at least initially, will be played without fans, the players would be asked to accept a further reduction in pay, most likely by agreeing to a set percentage of revenues for this season only.

The idea behind such a plan, from the league’s perspective, would be to protect the players and owners against the economic uncertainty created by the virus.

The players agreed in March to prorate their salaries in a shortened season. Those salaries cover the regular season only, while postseason shares are based upon gate receipts. If the players agreed to a set percentage of revenue, they also would share any additional national TV money generated during the postseason.

Without the players making such a concession, league officials say they will spend more on player salaries than they would earn in revenue for every incremental regular-season game played without fans. The union believes the opposite to be true and that postseason TV and other revenue will further enhance the league’s financial position.

The salary issue remains a source of friction. If the owners say it is not economically feasible to play games without fans, the union almost certainly would ask to see financial proof. The teams do not provide the players with full access to their books.

A number of other considerations, financial and otherwise, will enter the discussions between players and owners. An expanded roster of as many as 45 to 50 players is expected. The parties also would need to determine medical protocols — for instance, how they would react if a player becomes infected with the virus.

The final details are to be determined. But a preferred blueprint is in place.

 

I think baseball in New York, Boston, and DC this year is going to be pretty risky.

 

Worldometers has only 750 deaths reported for today though nation wide.  Sundays are always a lower day though due to less staff.  So we'll have to see what the numbers are for Monday and Tuesday but at least the data seems to be on the downside of this.

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2 hours ago, hailfire4 said:

All the players agreed to was not to be paid for games not played period. They agreed to lose 1 game of pay for every under 162 played. This is why the players are pushing for doubleheaders 30 man rosters to play as many games they can. The problem is in empty stadiums these players are bringing the teams zero revenue cept for TV revenue. ticket sale refunds the teams are supposed to absorb that. Wanna know why the marlins make out like bandits? Their highest paid player Wei yen Chen gets 23 mill this year and he ain't even on team. yet an eighty game season costs him over 12 mill in pay and saves the marlins 12 mill. The playoffs is a different animal. Those teams get paid a set amount from MLB. Orioles make out good since Chris Davis gets half of the stupid contract they gave him. I do think the players will give more pay back for a universal DH the 30 man roster and other perks otherwise I don't think we have any season.

Ya that’s not right. They get paid at least some of there are no games. Think Trout still makes about 5k a day if that happens. 

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1 hour ago, FouLLine said:

 

I think baseball in New York, Boston, and DC this year is going to be pretty risky.

 

Worldometers has only 750 deaths reported for today though nation wide.  Sundays are always a lower day though due to less staff.  So we'll have to see what the numbers are for Monday and Tuesday but at least the data seems to be on the downside of this.

Never trust Sunday’s. Several states don’t report. 

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11 hours ago, FouLLine said:

 

I think baseball in New York, Boston, and DC this year is going to be pretty risky.

 

Worldometers has only 750 deaths reported for today though nation wide.  Sundays are always a lower day though due to less staff.  So we'll have to see what the numbers are for Monday and Tuesday but at least the data seems to be on the downside of this.

Sunday was our nation's lowest number of reported new cases since March 29th.

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13 hours ago, JE7HorseGod said:

I love how this is somehow the player's problem now that the owners didn't want to work out this particular scenario when empty stadiums were being discussed before they shut spring training down.

The players are the ones taking all the risk in this scenario, as I see it the owners have very little leverage to go back and ask for another deal because they could lose a portion of the revenue.  For years they've wanted to play their cards close to the vest about how they make their money because it benefits them, there's virtually no transparency with regards to gate vs tv vs all other revenue streams.

A new expanded playoff format plus being the only game in town when people are dying for something to watch should more than offset their gate losses when they get a new playoff deal.  I have no sympathy for these guys wanting to go back and get a bigger share of the pie when the deal is already in place.

 

If there still are no fans in the stands for the playoffs (expanded or not) the players would get paid nada for those games.Players are paid a percentage of the gate receipts for playoffs I doubt the owners would reap any more from the extra as their share of TV revenue would already have been set for TV deals.. With the economy tanking selling ad spots for extra games would be iffy at best

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2 minutes ago, Low and Away said:

If there still are no fans in the stands for the playoffs (expanded or not) the players would get paid nada for those games.Players are paid a percentage of the gate receipts for playoffs I doubt the owners would reap any more from the extra as their share of TV revenue would already have been set for TV deals.. With the economy tanking selling ad spots for extra games would be iffy at best

They're in the process of renegotiating for next year's playoff deals as the old one with Turner is expiring.

Whatever comes in could potentially be much more lucrative if there IS a playoff in 2020 and it rates well.

There are tons of public companies that are still making money in spite of the high unemployment numbers that would still want ad buys.

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